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Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 APO-Planar Aperture Series 'DeChambeau Yellow Wagon'

Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 APO-Planar (about $4490) for Nikon or Canon.

This ƒ/1.4 to ƒ/16 aperture series in Guide to Zeiss explores the slight telephoto effect and choice of aperture.

Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 APO-Planar Aperture Series 'DeChambeau Yellow Wagon'

  DeChambeau Yellow Wagon Nikon D810 + Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 APO-Planar @ ƒ/2
DeChambeau Yellow Wagon
Nikon D810 + Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 APO-Planar @ ƒ/2

Compared: Voigtlander Ultron 21mm f/1.8 vs Leica 21mm f/3.4 Super-Elmar-M ASPH (M240, Wyman Canyon Lower Cabin Interior)

Voigtlander Ultron 21m f/1.8 lens is about $1149 for Leica M.

In Guide to Leica at the Voigtlander Ultron 21mm f/1.8.

Compared: vs Leica 21/3.4 SEM and Voigtlander 21/4 (M240, Wyman Cabin Interior)

Includes HD and UltraHD aperture series and the Voigtlander Color-Skopar 21mm f/4 is included as well.

  Lower Cabin in Wyman Canyon Leica M Typ 240 + Voigtlander Ultron 21mm f/1.8 @ f/4
Lower Cabin in Wyman Canyon
Leica M Typ 240 + Voigtlander Ultron 21mm f/1.8 @ f/4

Chris L writes:

As a Voigtländer aficionado, I thought I should know if such a beast
existed in mounts other than Leica M.

Neither BHphoto nor Cosina/Voigt themselves mention it in Canon EF or
Nikon F mounts.

DIGLLOYD: the Voigtlander Ultron 21mm f/1.8 is an M-mount lens (Leica M rangefinder) with a short backfocus ; it is impossible to use it on a DSLR.

It could be used via an adapter on mirrorless cameras like the Sony A7s/A7/A7R, but ray angle issues would severely degrade its peripheral quality at wider apertures. Stopped down to ƒ/8 - ƒ/11 it might perform well however. See the coverage of various wide angle Leica M lenses on Sony A7/A7R in Guide to Leica.

Server Change: New Image Server

A new high performance image server is in place for this site.

With a suitably fast internet connection, an entire ƒ/1.4 - ƒ/16 aperture series in 4K Ultra HD size can be viewed in about 5 seconds (you’d want a 4K display for the UltraHD size, generally speaking, otherwise the regular 2560 X 1600 size is more appropriate).

Nikon D750: Incremental Move Forward, but Plows no New Ground

Pre-order the Nikon D750 at B&H Photo.

As an incremental and worthwhile advance, the Nikon D750 makes sense: a full-frame sensor with tiltable rear LCD (allows angled shooting more easily), and the now de rigueur wireless support which surely will be embedded in all cameras before long.

The Nikon D750 looks to be a solid offering. In viewing its rear control layout, its seem to match the D810 control layout, which is important for anyone considering a D810 + D750 pairing: the variance between the D600 and D800 drove me crazy when shooting the two together. But I cannot say whether its operational behavior is identical.

Innovation is not to be found, not even following in Sony’s footsteps by offering 4K video and an optional hot-shoe-mount EVF. And surely it is time for Nikon to think about ditching that mirror box in at least one model for a high res EVF model. The D750 is a solid incremental advance and that is not a bad thing, but neither is it exciting.

In terms of value, when I look at any camera over $2000, I look at the total system cost over time. At about $2299, its $1000 less than than the Nikon D810 which seems like a lot more, and it is a lot more—without context. But consider lenses and accessories: what is the total system cost and in that context, does a D750 make sense versus a D810? The D810 seems likely to hold better resale value too. 24 megapixels is enough for most all purposes but if one is shooting high-grade lenses, then it makes more sense to go to 36, because 36 is if nothing else oversampling or higher image quality in total.

Nikon D750 rear controls
Nikon D750 rear controls

September 12, 2014

Tonight, Nikon announced the D750, an exciting addition to its FX-format D-SLR camera lineup. This full frame camera features a powerful combination of pro-caliber photo and video features for both professionals and enthusiasts in a compact and lightweight body. The Nikon D750 features a 24.3-megapixel sensor and is the first FX-Format Nikon D-SLR to feature a tilting Vari-angle LCD display and built-in Wi-Fi capabilities.

Additionally, Nikon has also announced a new compact SB-500 multimedia Speedlight with a built in LED, and the fast AF-S NIKKOR 20mm f/1.8G ED lens, the latest addition to Nikon’s expanding line of f/1.8 prime lenses.

Nikon D750
· Powerful photo and video features for both professionals and advanced enthusiasts
· New 24.3-megapixel FX-format CMOS sensor provides rich colors and gradation
o EXPEED 4 Image Processor (similar to D810 and D4S) increases efficiency and performance
· Offers the ability to share images instantly with built-in Wi-Fi
· Nikon’s first FX-format D-SLR with a tilting LCD display (3.2 in. 1,229K dot), helps frame photos and videos from a variety of previously difficult angles
· Pro 51-point AF System great for tracking wildlife or sports
o Group Area AF
o Lock in subjects in as little as -3 EV illumination
· 6.5 frames per second (fps) burst rate at full resolution
· Reaches the same level of advanced video functionality as the Nikon D810
o Full HD 1920x1080 resolution at 60/30/24p
o Power Aperture for smooth transitions and other advanced video features
o Record to dual SD memory card slots or output via HDMI
· Optional MB-D16 battery pack provides extended battery life and vertical grip
· Available in late September for $2,299.95 SRP (body only) and as a kit with the AF-S NIKKOR 24-120mm f/4 VR lens in mid-October

SB-500 Speedlight

· Compact yet powerful Speedlight and LED video light
· Covers wide 16mm/24mm (FX/DX) with a 90-degree vertical swivel and 180-degree rotation
o Great for bouncing light of ceilings and soft lighting effects
· Simplified controls and easily integrated into a CLS system
· Powerful (100 lux) LED light for video applications
· Runs on two AA batteries
· Available in late September for $249.95 SRP

AF-S NIKKOR 20mm f/1.8G ED
· Ultra-fast wide-angle addition to f/1.8 series of FX-format lenses
· First ultra-wide lens with a f/1.8 aperture, great for architecture, interiors and landscapes
· Capable of quiet and fast AF operation
· Nano Crystal Coat reduces ghost and flare
· Available in late September for $799.95 SRP

Sigma announces dp1 Quattro with 28mm (equiv) Wide Angle Lens

Pre-order the Sigma dp1 Quattro at B&H Photo.

Sigma has announced the dp1 Quattro, the next incarnation of its dp Quattro line, which deliver image detail beyond the apparent pay grade. See the in depth reviwe of the Sigma dp2 Quattro and the Sigma DP Merrill line.

The dp1 Quattro utilizes a newly developed, fixed 19mm F2.8 wide-angle lens, equivalent to a 28mm on a 35mm camera, that is specifically designed and optimized to pair with Sigma’s new Quattro sensor, making it the widest of the dp Quattro trio of cameras.

One FLD glass element paired with two glass mold aspherical lenses minimize aberration. An optimized telecentric design improves image quality throughout the frame to maximize the resolution power of the Foveon senor. The dp2 (30mm) is currently available and the dp3’s pricing and availability has yet to be announced.

In addition to the availability of the dp Quattro camera, Sigma has also announced a new LCD View Finder LVF-01, which is exclusively designed for the Quattro series of cameras. The LVF-01 attaches to the camera’s LCD display to eliminate outside light and features a diopter adjustment range from -2 to +1. Coupled with the camera’s high-performance lens and coating, it magnifies the LCD display 2.5 times, allowing photographers to check the focus more easily with enhanced clarity and visibility. The easy handling of the viewfinder also helps reduce camera shake.

The LCD viewfinder is a smart move, akin to the Zacuto Z-Finder that I use with all my cameras. It will be interesting to see how the optics and mounting of the viewfinder work. It does seem a bit silly not just ot have designed-in a hot shoe mount for an EVF, but it’s very good to see a solution offered.

Sigma DP Quattro sensor design
Sigma dp2 Quattro sensor design
Sigma DP2 Quattro
Sigma dp2 Quattro shown

Sigma Corporation of America Announces Availability of dp1 Quattro Camera, New Quattro Series View Finder

Widest of the high-powered, compact trio on shelves in mid-October, new accessory available in December

RONKONKOMA, N.Y. — September 12, 2014 Sigma Corporation of America, a leading researcher, developer, manufacturer and service provider of some of the world's most impressive lines of lenses, cameras and flashes, today announced the availability of the Sigma dp1 Quattro camera and a new view finder that will magnify Quattro cameras’ LCD screens. The second compact camera in the dp Quattro series will be available in the United States in mid-October and the accessory will be sold separately beginning in December. The pricing of both products has not yet been announced.
The dp1 Quattro utilizes a newly developed, fixed 19mm F2.8 wide-angle lens, equivalent to a 28mm on a 35mm camera, that is specifically designed and optimized to pair with Sigma’s new Quattro sensor, making it the widest of the dp Quattro trio of cameras. One FLD glass element paired with two glass mold aspherical lenses minimize aberration. An optimized telecentric design improves image quality throughout the frame to maximize the resolution power of the Foveon senor. The dp2 (30mm) is currently available and the dp3’s pricing and availability has yet to be announced.
In addition to the availability of the dp Quattro camera, Sigma has also announced a new LCD View Finder LVF-01, which is exclusively designed for the Quattro series of cameras. The LVF-01 attaches to the camera’s LCD display to eliminate outside light and features a diopter adjustment range from -2 to +1. Coupled with the camera’s high-performance lens and coating, it magnifies the LCD display 2.5 times, allowing photographers to check the focus more easily with enhanced clarity and visibility. The easy handling of the viewfinder also helps reduce camera shake.

As with all the cameras in the Quattro series, the dp1 Quattro boasts a redesigned camera body that enables optimal lens and sensor performance and it contains the newly developed Foveon “Quattro” Direct Image sensor, which is the only of its kind.
The Quattro sensor is a three-layered, panchromatic silicon chip whose green-sensitive middle and red-sensitive bottom layers each have 4.9 MP and record only color/chrominance information. The top blue layer captures chrominance and resolution/luminance information with 19.6 MP, resulting in greater detail capture and resolution capabilities that are higher than the Merrill DP camera line. The Quattro sensor’s architecture also contributes to true color rendition and more detail capture, delivering even more realistic images as well as faster image processing, improving overall user experience.
”We value image quality above all else and the engineering, craftsmanship and functional design of the Quattro cameras produce emotive imagery with the richest tones, gradations and textures,” said Mark Amir-Hamzeh, president of Sigma Corporation of America. “Our Sigma users are particularly enamored with the wide, 19mm lens in the dp1, which has been redesigned to maximize the capabilities of the Quattro sensor.”
The dp1 Quattro camera will differ from earlier generations of the DP cameras, as it will feature:

  • Foveon direct image sensor that produces images that are more colorful, rich, deep and faithful than ever before
  • Improved battery life
  • Fixed focal length cameras, providing the most optimized combination for unmatched image quality.
  • The TRUE III Image processor, providing ultrafast processing of an immense volume of image data without any deterioration of the final image
  • Better high ISO performance with one to two stops of improvement
  • Improved 3A performance: Auto Exposure, Auto Focus and Auto White Balance
  • Enhanced Standard, Vivid, Neutral, Portrait, Landscape, FOV Classic Blue, and Monochrome color modes, and new Cinema, Sunset Red, Forest Green, and FOV Classic Yellow color modes

To locate the closest authorized Sigma dealer, visit http://www.sigmaphoto.com/where-to-buy-sigma. For more information about Sigma Corporation of America and the Quattro line of cameras, visit www.sigmaphoto.com.

SanDisk 512GB SDXC Card

Pre-Order the monster SanDisk 512GB SDXC card at B&H Photo.

These things are getting huge! But I suppose that in 10 years they will be 512TB holographic or something.

I like big cards because I can leave all shoots on them as additional backups when in the field (no need to erase). I download each day’s shoot as I go, leaving it on the card as a backup. See a more in-depth discussion in Downloading and Backing Up Images In The Field in the DAP Workflow section.

SanDisk 512GB SDXC card
SanDisk 512GB SDXC card

Richard J writes:

These cards are getting bigger and bigger all the time and as I had a HDD failure this week.

I am starting to wonder If these cards might be an alternative to long term storage solutions, rather then optical or tape back up. If a card was tested and stored correctly what would be the usable and safe longevity of doing storage this way. This card is a bit expensive but 256 GB is not too bad.

DIGLLOYD: the spare blocks (“over provisioning”) of a good 2.5" SSD along with its high level of error correction makes them a better choice than camera cards which have far lower lifetime wear cycles as well. The ultimate is something like the OWC Enterprise SSD, which has 28% over provisioning and a 7 year warranty. That’s total overkill though (designed to be “beat up” continuously)—better to buy the regular versions like the OWC Electra SSD, and buy more of them (for redundancy).

But most people want an external case. My favorite here is the OWC Mercury Envoy Pro EX. Or any of the OWC Mercury Elite Pro Mini bus powered variants with a 2.5" SSD inside. But the cheapest option (again think redundancy) are 2.5" hard drives in USB bus powered cases. This is all assuming less than huge storage requirements.

This Site is Up, Comcast Users Might have Issues Reaching it (FIXED)

UPDATE: issue resolved as of 09:00 September 11. It was an ISP routing failure (not this site’s server).

This site is inacessible for some Comcast users (including me, I have dual internet connections one of which is Comcast). That explains strangely low traffic today.

It’s now at Comcast Level III support. It appears to be some general routing failure handoff between Comcast and qwest.net, or wider. Nothing I can do except hope that their Level III support team fixes it ASAP. Even Comcast.com seems to be down too through another ISP, thought AT&T internet works to Comcast.com.

The issue is apparently affecting other sites too. For example, I am unable to reach http://blog.macsales.com. That could be a coincidence; I can’t be sure. It appears to be a bi-directional problem, which makes it even more confusing.

The site is up and functional through other service providers such as A&T which I’ve confirmed myself (internet via iPhone cell connection), and also confirmed via one reader.

diglloyd$ traceroute diglloyd.com
traceroute to diglloyd.com (204.11.224.34), 64 hops max, 52 byte packets
1 192.168.1.129 (192.168.1.129) <== diglloyd comcast link
2 * * *
3 c-73-170-32-1.hsd1.ca.comcast.net (73.170.32.1)
4 te-0-3-0-8-sur04.santaclara.ca.sfba.comcast.net (68.85.191.17)
5 68.87.194.2 (68.87.194.2)
te-0-5-0-1-sur03.santaclara.ca.sfba.comcast.net (69.139.198.101)
te-1-1-0-10-ar01.oakland.ca.sfba.comcast.net (68.87.226.130)
6 be-90-ar01.sfsutro.ca.sfba.comcast.net (68.85.155.14)
7 68.86.166.141 (68.86.166.141)
8 be-17-pe02.11greatoaks.ca.ibone.comcast.net (68.86.83.46)
9 snj-edge-03.inet.qwest.net (67.133.42.213)
10 svl2-cntr-01.inet.qwest.net (205.171.244.2) <=== black hole
11 * * *
12 * * *
13 * * *
14 * * * diglloyd$ ping 205.171.244.2 <== the black hole above
PING 205.171.244.2 (205.171.244.2): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 205.171.244.2: icmp_seq=0 ttl=247 time=16.531 ms
64 bytes from 205.171.244.2: icmp_seq=1 ttl=247 time=17.519 ms
64 bytes from 205.171.244.2: icmp_seq=2 ttl=247 time=20.171 ms

Voigtlander Ultron 21mm f/1.8 on Leica M Typ 240 Aperture Series 'Wyman Canyon Lower Cabin Exterior'

Voigtlander Ultron 21m f/1.8 lens is about $1149 for Leica M.

This is the first look in Guide to Leica at the Voigtlander Ultron 21mm f/1.8.

Voigtlander 21mm f/1.8 on Leica M Typ 240 Aperture Series 'Wyman Canyon Lower Cabin Exterior'

Includes HD and UltraHD aperture series from ƒ/1.8 through ƒ/16 including ƒ/9.5 and ƒ/13 and in both color and black and white, along with large crops including a 4K UltraHD center crop.

  Lower Cabin in Wyman Canyon Leica M Typ 240 + Voigtlander Ultron 21mm f/1.8 @ f/2
Lower Cabin in Wyman Canyon
Leica M Typ 240 + Voigtlander Ultron 21mm f/1.8 @ f/2

4K Video: What I want to See at Photokina is Functional, not Fancy

The Olympus E-M5 (or Olympus E-M1) are the only cameras I have found suitable/useable for the cycling videos I want to do because of sensor image stabilization for any/all lenses, plus having the right size/mass and lens selection. Specialty helmet mount requirements and still photo and yet-another-piece-of-gear issues make GoPro unattractive to me, though that might differ if it were a regular/routine use.

I’m not looking for specialty products or 3 pound rigs (I have to pedal it all up after all), just a compact system that delivers high quality 4K video. While the Panasonic GH-4 delivers oustanding 4K video and is an acceptable form factor, it has no in-body sensor image stabilization, and hence no stabilization for the 8mm fisheye or 12mm wide angle lenses thatI prefer for this type of use.

My cycling videos show what I have in mind.

  Aug 16, 2012 in White Mountains — “Hail-covered Meadow Crossing” on Moots Mooto X YBB 29er mountain bike, Olympus E-M5
Aug 16, 2012 in White Mountains — “Hail-covered Meadow Crossing”
on Moots Mooto X YBB 29er mountain bike, Olympus E-M5

Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 APO-Planar Aperture Series 'Trees, Tiles, Tower'

Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 APO-Planar (about $4490) for Nikon or Canon.

This at-dusk aperture series in Guide to Zeiss explores the depth of field at substantial distance showing that it’s a lot less than one might think. The full aperture range from ƒ/1.4 through ƒ/16 shows the entire story, along with large crops.

Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 APO-Planar Aperture Series 'Trees, Tiles, Tower'

  Trees, Tiles, Tower Nikon D810 + Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 APO-Planar @ ƒ/2.8
Trees, Tiles, Tower
Nikon D810 + Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 APO-Planar @ ƒ/2.8

Using Camera Profiles in Adobe Camera Raw (Nikon D810 examples)

In the DAP Workflow section, I discuss how I go about choosing a camera profile and the various settings to tweak the image to my liking. Shown are all variants of camera profiles for the Nikon D810.

ACR/Lightroom Camera Profile for Raw Conversion (Nikon D810)

  ACR conversion settings
ACR conversion settings

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