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Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 Aperture Series: Meltwater Flowing Over Lichens on White Granite (Hasselblad X1D II 50C)

This aperture series from f/1.9 through f/9 evaluates the closeup performance of the Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 at a distance roughly equivalent a loose head shot.

Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 Aperture Series: Meltwater Flowing Over Lichens on White Granite, Closeup

Includes images from f/1.9 through f/9 at up to full camera resolution.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad X Medium Format

Meltwater Flowing Over Lichens on White Granite, Closeup
f4 @ 1/500 sec lens shutter, ISO 100; 2020-05-31 15:18:26
Hasselblad X1D II 50C + Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 @ 65.5mm equiv (80mm)
ENV: Meysan Lakes area, altitude 11340 ft / 3456 m, 60°F / 15°C
RAW: Enhance Details, LACA corrected, vignetting corrected, pull 0.7 stops, +40 Whites, +30 Clarity

[low-res image for bot]

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Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 Aperture Series: Meysan Lakes Meadow (Hasselblad X1D II 50C)

This aperture series from f/2.8 through f/9 evaluates mid-range to far-distance performance of the Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 including sharpness and overall performance and with special note of the aperture required for full edge-to-edge-sharpness.

Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 Aperture Series: Meysan Lakes Meadow

Includes images from f/2.8 through f/9 at up to full camera resolution.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad X Medium Format

I did the 5600 vertical foot ascent with a friend (usual gate locked, had to hike from 6200') and climbed all the way to 11600'. My friend stayed the night and later told me he had the best sunrise he had ever seen. I descended and arrived back at 10 PM, feeling very uncomfortable (hke is nearly as hard as Mt Whitney from Whitney Portal), with sore legs that lasted for days (cycling legs are not hiking legs!). The bugs were not yet out but the frogs were going bonkers. This whole meadow was on the verge of being verdant green within days, with shoots everywhere right at the height of the dead last-season grass.

Meysan Lakes Meadow
f5.6 @ 1/320 sec lens shutter, ISO 100; 2020-05-31 17:28:38
Hasselblad X1D II 50C + Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 @ 53.2mm equiv (65mm) + polarizer Breakthrough Photography
ENV: Meysan Lakes meadow, altitude 11140 ft / 3395 m, 60°F / 15°C
RAW: Enhance Details, LACA corrected, vignetting corrected, pull 0.4 stops, +40 Shadows, +30 Whites, +30 Clarity

[low-res image for bot]
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Reader Question on Hasselblad X1D II: Overheating?

Cheng C writes:

Thanks for your review and posts about Hasselblad X1D II 50C.

I’ve heard talks about the system got overheating easily, but some people also say the all metal camera body is designed as a “heat sink” to dissipate heat.

I use Canon 5DM4 and I’ve never experienced any overheating before. I can understand that as a mirrorless system with a large sensor the power assumption is much larger than a normal full frame small format DSLR, thus possible overheating, but this still concerns me.

What’s your in-field observation and opinion on this overheating thing? Do you think the heat will affect image quality and eventually wear down electronic parts? If so, what do you suggest to do to minimize this side-effect.

DIGLLOYD: my understanding is that the Hasselblad X1D II body is designed as one large heat sink (according to Hasselblad is my recollection)—it had better, since it has tightly-packed components in its compact form factor. But note that much of the X1D II camera body is not bare metal and thus is not effective as a heat sink. Add on an L-bracket and there is another layer over it, and if there is sun exposure that heats everything up—keep it out of the sun.

For the manner in which I have been shooting the Hasselblad X1D II, heat has not been an issue so far. But most of my shooting so far has been in the 50°F to 70°F range so that an adequate temperature differential exists for the camera to shed heat to the environment.

Hasselblad X1D II

However, the weather is now hitting 80°F at 8400 feet elevation and 100°F at 4400' elevation. And if the camera is in the sun, the camera body temperature will skyrocket from the sun beating on it, which is why I try to keep it out of the sun. Along with a high ambient temperature, heat dissipation from critical camera internals to the environment is greatly reduced by this much-narrowed temperature differential, so that the sensor and internals will be operating at far higher temperatures—at a minimum no less than ambient temperature.

My recollection is that baseline noise roughly doubles about every 10°F (fact-check me on that please) which has major implications for noise, even at base ISO. In other words, operating at 50°F vs 90°F will result in far more noise and perhaps in a non-linear fashion, because the less the temperature differential, the more difficult it is for the camera to dissipate internal heat.

So yes, I do think that the Hasselblad X1D II could “overheat”, by which I don’t necessarily mean that it would stop functioning. But it would definitely produce images of lower quality due to increased noise. How much the Fujifilm GFX100 is affected in similar conditions is hard to say, but it is a much larger camera body and uses less power from what I see, so the issue should be less.

Power consumption ===> heat

A key point is that the X1D II (and X1D) chew up battery power far faster than other cameras, and all that battery usage ends up as heat inside the camera. So power usage relates directly to the ability of a camera to keep its operating temperature reasonable.

With my shooting style I would say that it eats batteries at 3X the rate of the Fujifilm GFX100, at least (while the GFX100 has two batteries, I rarely drained more than one battery). If so, the X1D II needs to dissipate considerably more heat from a smaller camera body with more tightly-packed components. How that interacts with its natural heat sink capabilities, I don't know, but much of the X1D II camera body is not bare metal and won

With the Fujifilm GFX100, I could shoot most days on one battery. With the Hasselblad X1D II, I shut the camera off frequently in order to cut power usage—a bit of a nuisance since its startup time is much longer than the Fujifilm medium format cameras. Even so, from 1/3 to 1/2 the battery is drained after 80 shots or so because I spend a lot of time with the EVF for careful composition and focusing, and doing so consumes a lot of battery power.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad X Medium Format

Which Camera System 📷 is Best?
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Avoid costly mistakes and get the ideal system for your needs: diglloyd photographic consulting.

Appeal to Readers, help needed: Please Buy Your Camera Gear at B&H Photo Via My Links

If B&H is not applicable to what you are buying, please use my Amazon link at the very top of every blog page.

A big thank you to readers who have been helping me by buying at B&H Photo through ads or links on this site.

I know that some of you are overseas and while B&H does ship internationally, there can be various issues in some countries that make it tough—understood.

But I need the help of the rest of you—B&H has just reduced my advertising fee in a substantial way because of not enough sales are coming from readers via this site. They are great folks at B&H and they were fair, but less business delivered means a lower fee—ouch. So I need to 'deliver'.

So I thank you in advance for helping me out by clicking through to B&H via my ads and links—I have a family to support and any cuts are a big deal to me.

  • Clicking through once per browser session is good enough for the whole session at B&H, so if you land there and then search or find other things—that’s all good,.
  • If clicking through an email sent by B&H, I get no credit (e.g., emails on product availability, pre-order, etc), so please click through from this site (any ad or link will do).
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Sensor Cleanliness: how to change a lens so as to minimize dust on the sensor

This is my procedure when working in the field.

The step that counts is #4 which I can do in under 5 seconds (faster on some cameras), which greatly minimizes the chances for the ingress of dust.

  1. Barring other conveniences, squat or sit low on the ground just in case of a fumble/drop error—even a mild impact can ruin a lens optically even if it shows no physical damage. Hard experience has taught me this and it has been years since I have had that unfortunate experience.
  2. Find a wind shadow if available and/or wait for a lull in the wind and always turn your back to the wind and shield the camera with your body.
  3. Release and partially loosen the lens on the camera so that you can quickly swap on the new lens. Some cameras designs place the release button on the wrong side, making this even more important for a right-hander like me.
  4. All in one quick operation: remove the lens cap from the lens, remove the pre-loosened lens from the camera, attach the new lens, cap the removed lens.

If it is extremely dusty and windy, carrying a changing bag might be warranted, or stick to a zoom lens and avoid changing at all. But if it’s that bad, you’ve got other problems and I won’t subject my equipment to it because fine dust can get into lens motors and other places (Burning Man is the kiss of death for gear). Some types of dust can get in and cause steady damage until gear fails.

View dust blowers at B&H Photo.

Avoidance and mitigation

Changing lenses without contaminating the sensor is one concern, but the key one is that high-res digital is extremely difficult to work within in wind (for sharp pictures) unless very high shutter speeds are used, which is usually not viable for landscape work because of the need to stop down.

Even a modest wind poses very high risk for blurred images, so I avoid such conditions, or wait for lulls on blustery days where it can puff to 25 mph then to almost nothing. Or find wind shadows and I always shield the camera and tripod with my body as close as possible, including hunching very close and around the rig when the wind is a significant issue.

Earth Shadow Rising... with a big chunk of dust on the sensor
f9 @ 0.3 sec lens shutter, ISO 100; 2020-05-19 20:01:20
Hasselblad X1D II 50C + Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 @ 65.5mm equiv (80mm)
ENV: Mt Whitney foothills, altitude 6400 ft / 1951 m, 55°F / 12°C
RAW: Enhance Details, vignetting corrected, pull 0.4 stops, +76 Shadows, +40 Whites, +20 Dehaze, +20 Clarity

[low-res image for bot]

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Reader Questions on Hasselblad X1D II: Leaf Shutter Vibration vs Electronic Shutter

Chris L writes:

Thank you for your ongoing reviews of the Hasselblad X1D II system.

Your medium format coverage is the most thorough and helpful available anywhere today.

One other significant difference between the D1X and GFX systems is Hasselblad’s employment of leaf shutters. One comparative reviewer reported that the X1D lens leaf shutters caused vibration which impacted image quality relative to the GFX when shooting with its electronic shutter. Could you comment on any pros and cons of leaf shutters you’ve found for (non-strobe) landscape work?

Hasselblad X1D II

DIGLLOYD: the leaf shutter on the Hasselblad XCD lenses sees loud when all else is quiet and it definitely concerns me as a source of vibration. Accordingly it is on my to-do list as part of my review of the Hasselblad X1D II system

That said, the Hasselblad X1D II is perfectly capable of using an all-electronic shutter (ES shutter). As it has no focal plane shutter, there is no EFC shutter option.

The main issue in diagnosing sharpness losses from the leaf shutter is figuring out which conditions provoke the most vibration, so I’ll start with the Hasselblad XCD 135mm f/2.8 + TC1.7 and work from there.

Controlling shutter speed

The tricky part is getting a range of shutter speeds out in the field. To do that I will use a Breakthrough Photography X4 circular polarizer.

I also have a Breakthrough Photography ND polarizer that will allow me to get the shutter speeds down to a range (in sunlight) for testing in bright daylight. See Breakthrough Photography 6-stop ND Polarizer for Motion Blur in Broad Daylight + Reader Comments.

Breakthrough Photography magnetic X4 circular polarizer includes lens-cleaning cloth and ironclad guarantee

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad X Medium Format

Reader Question on Hasselblad X1D II: Dust vs Fujifilm GFX100 and Fujifilm GFX-50S

See also Sensor Cleanliness: how to change a lens so as to minimize dust on the sensor.

Chris L writes:

Thank you for your ongoing reviews of the Hasselblad X1D II system.

Your medium format coverage is the most thorough and helpful available anywhere today.

The Fujifilm GFX cameras are the first mirrorless systems I’ve used (initially the Fujifilm GFX-50S and now the Fujifilm GFX100) which don’t require frequent sensor cleaning. (By comparison, the Sony A7R series cameras, which I also use regularly, are dust magnets).

One explanation I’ve read is that Fujifilm’s IBIS system is better at shaking dust off (and can be set to do so automatically); another is that the GFX sensors stacks and shutters are somehow designed to reduce dust buildup and/or visibility.

As the X1D depends mostly on primes, lens changes will inevitably expose its sensor to even more dust than the typical GFX kit, but Hasselblad doesn’t appear to have any particular mechanisms to deal with this problem.

Could you comment on the degree to which you’ve found dust an issue after shooting the X1D in windy and dusty environments?

DIGLLOYD: the Sony A7R IV/III/II/I anti-dust system is worthless—I have never seen it succeed in removing visible dust spots—see Sony A7R IV: Horrible Sensor Dust Problems and sensor cleanliness.

View dust blowers at B&H Photo.

Hasselblad X1D II

The Hasselblad X1D II has the same exposed sensor as the Sony cameras (but much larger!). As far as I can tell it is just as bad as Sony. However, Hasselblad doesn’t pretend to have a useless dust-off feature like Sony does, so that’s a plus.

Making things worse, the X1D II has no focal plane shutter, so there is nothing to be closed to protect the sensor from the environment (not that Sony bothers to do so, which is really bad design).

I experienced my major first dust spot within 15 minutes of using the Hasselblad X1D II, roughly the 10th frame I took. I had done one lens swap, it was not windy at all and I took my usual extra care as described below. That was enough for a very large piece of dust to stick to the sensor which polluted the rest of the night’s shooting. I was able to blow it off with a bulb blower.

The Fujifilm medium format system is far better designed for anti-dust, more on that below.

Earth Shadow Rising
f9 @ 0.3 sec lens shutter, ISO 100; 2020-05-19 20:01:20
Hasselblad X1D II 50C + Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 @ 65.5mm equiv (80mm)
ENV: Mt Whitney foothills, altitude 6400 ft / 1951 m, 55°F / 12°C
RAW: Enhance Details, vignetting corrected, pull 0.4 stops, +76 Shadows, +40 Whites, +20 Dehaze, +20 Clarity

[low-res image for bot]

Dust: Hasselblad X1D II vs Fujifilm GFX100, Fujifilm GFX-50S

See also Fujifilm GFX Sensor Cover Glass Thickness.

Fujifilm GFX100

In my extensive experience with the Fujifilm GFX100 and the Fujifilm GFX-50S, dust has never been an issue of concern. The occasional minor dust specks tend to disappear on their own using the anti-dust feature, but it is the ingenious 9mm spacing that is most important.

The discussion of the sensor cover glass on the Fujifilm GFX on the Fujifilm-X web site shows a 9mm spacing gap to the sensor, done to reduce dust issues by defocusing the dust, shown below. It is the best design in the entire camera industry in terms of eliminating dust problems.

People often forget about the cover glass of a mount. This glass is meant to protect and to shake dust off the sensor. The cover glass is placed in the furthest position possible from the sensor.

Why far away? The closer the dust is to the sensor, the worse for the image quality. The dust becomes more visible if it is closer to the sensor surface as it gets into the depth of field. The cover glass should be placed as far away as possible from the sensor. If there is a mirror box, then there is minimal room to move. But this is possible for G Mount as it is comprised of a mirrorless structure.

The cover glass is placed 9mm away from the sensor surface. If you know about mount design, then we are certain that you will be surprised with the figure.

Fujifilm GFX sensor cover glass spacing to the focal plane

 

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Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 Aperture Series: Forested Mountains and Clouds (Hasselblad X1D II 50C)

This aperture series from f/2.8 through f/8 evaluates very far distance performance of the Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 including sharpness and overall lens correction, and lens symmetry.

Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 Aperture Series: Forested Mountains and Clouds

Includes images from f/2.8 through f/8 at up to full camera resolution.

The about $2750 Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 might be the best value in the lens lineup! Performance is so strong that a 100-megapixel sensor could capture considerably more detail. Which makes it imperative for Hasselblad to issue a camera with a 100MP sensor, which to me would make the appeal of the system far greater, given the extreme lens quality and outstanding quality control versus Fujifilm medium format.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad X Medium Format

Survivor Pine on Rock Outcrop
f2.8 @ 1/500 sec lens shutter, ISO 100; 2020-05-20 16:58:48
Hasselblad X1D II 50C + Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 @ 53.2mm equiv (65mm) + polarizer Zeiss
ENV: Horseshoe Meadows Rd, altitude 8800 ft / 2682 m, 60°F / 15°C
RAW: Enhance Details, pull 0.17 stops, +100 Shadows, -88 Highlights, +55 Whites, saturation -6, +20 Clarity, USM {12,50,0}

[low-res image for bot]

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Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 Aperture Series: Granite and Pines View Down Canyon Watershed (Hasselblad X1D II 50C)

This aperture series from f/1.9 through f/9 evaluates the near-to-far distance of the Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 including sharpness and overall lens correction, and how depth of field develops with stopping down.

Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 Aperture Series: Granite and Pines View Down Canyon Watershed

Includes images from f/1.9 through f/9 at up to full camera resolution.

The unstable lens focus with the XCD 80/1.9 ruined f/11 for this series, so it is not included.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad X Medium Format

Granite and Pines View Down Canyon Watershed
f2.8 @ 1/15 sec lens shutter, ISO 100; 2020-05-20 19:57:16
Hasselblad X1D II 50C + Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 @ 65.5mm equiv (80mm)
ENV: Horseshoe Meadows Rd, altitude 7600 ft / 2316 m, 55°F / 12°C
RAW: Enhance Details, pull 0.6 stops, +40 Whites, +10 Dehaze, +20 Clarity

[low-res image for bot]

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Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 Aperture Series: Survivor Pine on Rock Outcrop (Hasselblad X1D II 50C)

This aperture series from f/2.8 through f/11 evaluates relatively close-range performance of the Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 including sharpness and overall lens correction, lens symmetry, focus shift and field curvature.

I comment on exposure consistency across apertures as well as vignetting correction, which seems broken in Adobe Camera Raw for the Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8.

Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 Aperture Series: Survivor Pine on Rock Outcrop

Includes images from f/2.8 through f/11 at up to full camera resolution.

The about $2750 Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 might be the best value in the lens lineup! Performance is so strong that a 100-megapixel sensor could capture considerably more detail. Which makes it imperative for Hasselblad to issue a camera with a 100MP sensor, which to me would make the appeal of the system far greater, given the extreme lens quality and outstanding quality control versus Fujifilm medium format.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad X Medium Format

Survivor Pine on Rock Outcrop
f8 @ 1/125 sec lens shutter, ISO 100; 2020-05-20 17:13:45
Hasselblad X1D II 50C + Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 @ 53.2mm equiv (65mm) + polarizer Zeiss
ENV: Horseshoe Meadows Rd, altitude 8800 ft / 2682 m, 65°F / 18°C
RAW: Enhance Details, pull 0.12 stops, +56 Shadows, +40 Whites, +15 Clarity

[low-res image for bot]
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Hasselblad XCD 135m f/2.8 + TC 1.7x Aperture Series: View Down Canyon to Owens Lake Facility (Hasselblad X1D II 50C)

This aperture series from f/4.8 through f/8 evaluates the far-distance performance of the Hasselblad XCD 135mm f/2.8 with the Hasselblad TC1.7x teleconverter.

In my review of the Hasselblad X1D II 50C system:

Hasselblad XCD 135m f/2.8 + TC 1.7x Aperture Series: View Down Canyon to Owens Lake Facility

Includes images at up to full camera resolution.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad X Medium Format

View Down Canyon to Owens Lake Facility
f6.3 @ 3.2 sec electronic shutter, ISO 100; 2020-05-21 20:15:58
Hasselblad X1D II 50C + Hasselblad XCD 135mm f/2.8 @ 180.1mm equiv (220mm)
ENV: Horseshoe Meadows Rd, altitude 8600 ft / 2621 m, 58°F / 14°C
RAW: Enhance Details, LACA corrected, pull 0.5 stops, +50 Whites, +10 Contrast, +20 Dehaze, +10 Clarity, USM {10,50,0}

[low-res image for bot]
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Hasselblad XCD 135m f/2.8 + TC 1.7x Aperture Series: Lichen-Covered Granite Slab (Hasselblad X1D II 50C)

Earlier today I showed the performance of the Hasselblad XCD 135m f/2.8 on this scene.

This aperture series from f/4.8 through f/11 evaluates the medium distance performance of the Hasselblad XCD 135mm f/2.8 with the Hasselblad TC1.7x teleconverter.

In my review of the Hasselblad X1D II 50C system:

Hasselblad XCD 135m f/2.8 + TC 1.7x Aperture Series: Lichen-Covered Granite Slab

Includes images at up to full camera resolution.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad X Medium Format

Lichen-Covered Granite Slab
f8 @ 5.0 sec lens shutter, ISO 100; 2020-05-21 20:11:20
Hasselblad X1D II 50C + Hasselblad XCD 135mm f/2.8 @ 180.1mm equiv (220mm)
ENV: Horseshoe Meadows Rd, altitude 8800 ft / 2682 m, 58°F / 14°C
RAW: Enhance Details, LACA corrected, pull 0.5 stops, +20 Shadows, +40 Whites, Color Luminance {Yellows +40}, Color Saturation {Aquas +40, Oranges +40, Yellows +40}, +10 Contrast, +20 Dehaze, +20 Clarity, diffraction mitigating sharpening

[low-res image for bot]
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Alabama Hills Is Open to Visitors and Campers as of Friday May 22

I was evicted from Alabama Hills back on April 10.

The Alabama Hills area was reopened Friday May 22 in time for Memorial Day Weekend. Campers poured in Friday night like water through a breached dam, but now days are hot and the sand is dry and the flowers are desiccated, and.... lots and lots of campers, with polluted air from campfires along with human noises. The gestalt of the place is totally different than in March. It’s still special, but visit November through March for the best experience.

Not my thing at this point—crowded, dry and not at all like it was in March. But... one good storm could make it all interesting for a day or two. So head out and be prepared for good luck.

The most remote areas still have good photo opportunities; a little extra effort goes a long way. I might mountain bike to a place or two that is relatively empty to make some images if the clouds and weather present opportunities.

I was *so* embarrassingly lucky to enjoy the best year in 50 years (a local’s opinion) through March and early April with about 10% of normal visitation. The whole period was enthralling, and a treat that likely will never happen again. Actually—no—I have never believed in the depressing defeatist “trip of a lifetime” concept. Something even better will come along.

Are such things always luck? Maybe, maybe not—I keep getting lucky because... (my hypothesis) I expect to and keep the door open, so to speak—I travel and do most everything now expecting good things from serendipity, letting things flow as they are wont to. My concussion I would not care to repeat, but on top of red-pilling myself at age 6 through precocious logical analysis and rejection of dogma, the concussion enhanced all that by temporarily removed a processing module in my brain that peeled away a layer of the world.

Gorgeous Lenticular Clouds Looking South from Alabama Hills to Owens Lake
f1.8 @ 1/25 sec electronic shutter, ISO 50; 2020-04-04 19:22:51
Sony A7R IV + Sony FE 20mm f/1.8 G
ENV: Alabama Hills, altitude 5200 ft / 1585 m, 55°F / 12°C
RAW: LACA corrected, vignetting corrected, pull 1.1 stops, +100 Shadows, +55 Whites, +20 Clarity

[low-res image for bot]

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Hasselblad XCD 135m f/2.8 Aperture Series: Lichen-Covered Granite Slab (Hasselblad X1D II 50C)

This aperture series from f/2.8 through f/11 evaluates the far distance performance of the Hasselblad XCD 135mm f/2.8 including sharpness and overall lens correction, lens symmetry, focus shift and field curvature.

It also includes an exposure at f/9 in which focus was placed more to the distance for a superior total result to either f/8 or f/11, a frame instructive for practical field-use shooting.

Hasselblad XCD 135m f/2.8 Aperture Series: Lichen-Covered Granite Slab

Includes images at up to full camera resolution.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad X Medium Format

Lichen-Covered Granite Slab
f4 @ 0.4 sec lens shutter, ISO 100; 2020-05-21 20:03:09
Hasselblad X1D II 50C + Hasselblad XCD 135mm f/2.8 @ 110.5mm equiv (135mm)
ENV: Horseshoe Meadows Rd, altitude 8800 ft / 2682 m, 58°F / 14°C
RAW: Enhance Details, vignetting corrected, pull 0.75 stops, +40 Whites, Color Luminance {Yellows +20}, Color Saturation {Aquas +40, Oranges +40, Yellows +40}, +10 Contrast, +20 Dehaze, +10 Clarity

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Hasselblad X1D II 50C: Operational and Focusing Bugs

Within the first 15 minutes of usage, I found two serious bugs in the Hasselblad X1D II 50C. I have done everything Hasselblad has suggested including redoing all camera and lens firmware and spending half an hour on the phone—no solutions.

But there are more issue than just the first two.

BUG: Hasselblad X1D II Confirms Focus in Dim Light when Badly Out of Focus

Bug: Hasselblad X1D II Hangs with 20 Second or Longer Exposure

Bug: Hasselblad X1D II Sleeps, Won’t Wake Up

Unstable Lens Focus with Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9

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Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 Aperture Series: Lichen-Covered Granite Slab, View to Owens Lake (Hasselblad X1D II 50C)

This aperture series from f/1.9 through f/11 evaluates the far distance performance of the Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 including sharpness and overall lens correction, lens symmetry, focus shift and field curvature.

Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 Aperture Series: Lichen-Covered Granite Slab, View to Owens Lake

Includes images from f/1.9 through f/11 at up to full camera resolution.

Also noted is a serious unstable lens focus issue:

Unstable Lens Focus with Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad X Medium Format

View to Owens Lake from Horseshoe Meadows Rd
f2.8 @ 1/1000 sec lens shutter, ISO 100; 2020-05-20 16:27:08
Hasselblad X1D II 50C + Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 @ 65.5mm equiv (80mm) + polarizer Breakthrough Photography
ENV: Horseshoe Meadows Rd, altitude 8800 ft / 2682 m, 60°F / 15°C
RAW: Enhance Details, vignetting corrected, pull 1.1 stops, +40 Shadows, +50 Whites, Color Luminance {Blues -10, Yellows +10}, Color Saturation {Blues +20, Oranges +10, Yellows +15}, +10 Dehaze, +20 Clarity

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Hasselblad X1D II 50C: White Balance and Tint in Adobe Camera Raw, Mid-Day High Altitude Sunlight, DataColor SpyderCHECKR

This page assesses the white balance and tint required for raw processing in Adobe Camera Raw in mid-day sunlight with clear blue skies at an elevation of 8400 ft ~= 2560 meters in May. In such conditions, the sun is high overhead and the light is bluish (high color temperature).

Hasselblad X1D II 50C: White Balance and Tint in Adobe Camera Raw, Mid-Day High Altitude Sunlight, DataColor SpyderCHECKR

This page might save you time and effort in getting ideal color balance.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad X Medium Format

Setting the ACR color balance to “as shot” (camera was set to Daylight) results in color balance that is WAY off, being 4 points too green and 4 points too blue (in Lab mode) in this case. Clearly it is unwise to use “as shot” or “Daylight” with ACR. This is true of many cameras I have tested. Never assume that “as shot” or any fixed white balance setting is accurate for raw conversion; do your own evaluation as my instructions detail.

Spot-on neutral white balance and tint
f6.3 @ 1/640 sec lens shutter, ISO 100; 2020-05-20 13:04:21
Hasselblad X1D II 50C + Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 @ 65.5mm equiv (80mm)
ENV: Horseshoe Meadows Rd, altitude 8400 ft / 2560 m, 55°F / 12°C
RAW: vignetting corrected, +40 Whites, +10 Clarity
clear blue skies no clouds

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Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 Aperture Series: Lichen-Covered Granite Slab, View to Owens Lake (Hasselblad X1D II 50C)

This aperture series from f/2.8 through f/11 evaluates the far distance performance of the Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 including sharpness and overall lens correction, lens symmetry, focus shift and field curvature.

Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 Aperture Series: Lichen-Covered Granite Slab, View to Owens Lake

Includes images from f/2.8 through f/11 at up to full camera resolution.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad X Medium Format

View to Owens Lake from Horseshoe Meadows Rd
f2.8 @ 1/640 sec lens shutter, ISO 100; 2020-05-20 16:51:54
Hasselblad X1D II 50C + Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 @ 53.2mm equiv (65mm) + polarizer Zeiss
ENV: Horseshoe Meadows Rd, altitude 8800 ft / 2682 m, 60°F / 15°C
RAW: Enhance Details, vignetting corrected, pull 1.25 stops, +100 Shadows, +50 Whites, Color Luminance {Blues -5, Yellows +10}, Color Saturation {Blues +20, Oranges +10, Yellows +15}, +20 Dehaze, +20 Clarity

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Testing Started: Hasselblad X1D II 50C with Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8, Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9, Hasselblad XCD 135mm f/2.8

I’ve just started testing the Hasselblad X1D II 50C with Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8, Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9, Hasselblad XCD 135mm f/2.8. I am working directly with Hasselblad to get the Hasselblad XCD 45mm f/4 P on loan, but the whole COVID-19 situation is backing up shipping on gear.

I have to do a major resupply today and tomorrow (water, fuel, food, champagne and wine of course), but there should be a ton of coverage in coming ten days.

See my reviews of the Hasselblad XCD system in diglloyd Medium Format.

These Hasselblad XCD lenses are insanely sharp even wide open. Best in the business for medium format, on both sharpness and quality control (so far I see no lens skew issues). I do wish they had aperture rings though and I do wish Hasselblad would deliver a 100MP sensor camera body.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad X Medium Format

View to Owens Lake from Horseshoe Meadows Rd
f8 @ 1/125 sec lens shutter, ISO 100; 2020-05-20 16:28:04
Hasselblad X1D II 50C + Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9 @ 65.5mm equiv (80mm) + polarizer Breakthrough Photography
ENV: Horseshoe Meadows Rd, altitude 8600 ft / 2621 m, 55°F / 12°C
RAW: vignetting corrected, pull 0.9 stops, +80 Shadows, +50 Whites, +20 Clarity

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Sigma FE 105mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Aperture Series: View Over Alabama Hills to Wind Driven Snow on Whitney Range (Sony A7R IV)

I’ve added a 322-megapixel version of this image, upsampled using Gigapixel AI.

It shows some limits of the camera, but 60MP to 322MP is a big enlargement. And I am sure I could (with some time) arrive at better upsampling parameters.

Were it printed at 220 dpi, it could go to 100 inches ~= 2.5 meters wide.

Sigma FE 105mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Aperture Series: View Over Alabama Hills to Wind Driven Snow on Whitney Range

Includes images up to full camera resolution.

Important: due to the contrast, click to view this image in its own window. Viewing with an iMac 5K or similar is recommended.

View Over Alabama Hills to Wind Driven Snow on Whitney Range
f4 @ 1/1000 sec EFC shutter, ISO 50; 2020-03-24 17:20:54
Sony A7R IV + Sigma FE 105mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art
ENV: Alabama Hills, altitude 5100 ft / 1554 m, 55°F / 12°C
RAW: LACA corrected, vignetting corrected, push 0.17 stops, +100 Shadows, -100 Highlights, +50 Whites, +88 Blacks, Color Luminance {Blues -76, Purples +100}, +40 Dehaze, +30 Clarity, Chroma NR {40,20,50}, USM {20,50,0}
ACR BW07

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First Look: OWC ThunderBay 8

The OWC Thunderbay 8 is available in configurations up to 128TB (8 X 16TB).

I’ve started reviewing the OWC ThunderBay 8—awesome unit!

Overview of OWC ThunderBay 8

OWC ThunderBay 8: RAID-0 vs RAID5 vs RAID10 Performance

OWC ThunderBay 8: Examples of Various Configurations using SoftRAID

OWC Thunderbay 8: RAID-0 vs RAID-5 vs RAID-1+0

Slightly Delayed Testing: Hasselblad X1D II 50C with Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8, Hasselblad XCD 80mm f/1.9, Hasselblad XCD 135mm f/2.8, maybe Hasselblad XCD 45mm f/4 P

UPDATE: I’ve published the overview page, vignetting, distortion and MTF pages for each of these lenses.

See my reviews of the Hasselblad XCD system in diglloyd Medium Format.

Due to a shipping glitch, I will have this gear on Monday or Tuesday, about 6 days later than planned, around May 18 or 19.

I am working directly with Hasselblad to get the Hasselblad XCD 45mm f/4 P on loan—it might or might not work out.

The Hasselblad XCD 35-75mm f/3.5-4.5 is so far unobtanium. It’s a bummer that the 35-75mm zoom is not available yet since it would be ideal to compare it directly to the 45/4P and 65/2.8.


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