Upgrade the memory of your 2018 Mac mini up to 64GB

My Workhorse NEC PA302W Wide Gamut Professional Display is Discontinued — Get One While Available

See my color management wishlist and get NEC PA302W at B&H Photo. Unless you already have the NEC calibrator and software, be sure to get the NEC PA302W BK-SV.

My workhorse display, the NEC PA302W, is finally discontinued. It remains a critical piece of my workflow. See Long Term: Usage of my Workhorse NEC PA302W Wide Gamut Professional Display in My Sprinter Van + Reasons To Like in General for details.

There is still some stock at B&H Photo; you can buy the white one with the calibrator, or the black one without the calibrator, then buy the calibrator separately; I prefer the black bezel but either should be fine.

NEC Color Sensor and SpectraView II Software Kit

NEC PA302W-SV 30" 16:10 IPS Monitor with SpectraView II (White)

Note: on Thunderbolt 3 Macs, you’ll need DisplayPort to drive the screen. The OWC Thunderbolt 3 Dock solves it. See also Options for Connecting a Display with Mini DisplayPort or DisplayPort input to a Mac with Thunderbolt 3 / USB-C. There are also various USB-C to DisplayPort cables available, but for me these are no good because they terminate the Thunderbolt 3 bus and thus all devices would have to be on just to use the display.

Color gamut of NEC PA302W wide gamut display, full range calibration
Color gamut of NEC PA302W wide gamut display, full range calibration

Canon Announces More Canon RF Lenses for the Canon EOS R System, Due in 2019

Canon isn’t fooling around with its full-frame Canon EOS RP aggressively low price point.

Canon has also announced a compelling lens line rollout, all due in 2019, as listed below. All that’s missing is a high-megapixel Canon EOS R (odd that “P” for “pro” was used for the entry-level camera, not so great an idea, IMO).

This lens line covers 90% of the speed and focal length range needed by most photographers for most shooting.

Canon offerings might not show below here initially, please use links above.

 


Canon EOS RP: a 26-Megapixel Full-Frame Entry Level Mirrorless Camera Weighing only 1.07 Pounds

Canon isn’t fooling around here: a full-frame mirrorless camera starting at $1300 (without lens) is $600 or so below the about $2000 Nikon Z6. In this range of the market, that’s a huge price difference that positions the Canon EOS RP very aggressively. How will Nikon respond?

Even with the zoom it’s still persuasive for many buyers who buy and use only one lens—about $2600 Nikon Z6 with a 24-70mm zoom or about $2200 Canon EOS RP with 24-105mm zoom. Some readers quite fairly point out that the Canon EOS RP is a “stripped down” offering—true enough. I’d much rather the Canon EOS R.

APS-C still has a distinct price point difference, the gap being about $1000 with lens as in the new Fujifilm X-T30 with 15-45mm lens. But just how much that gap will narrow within a year or two remains to be seen.

The fact that Canon is being this aggressive on price with the new RF mount cameras suggests to me a well-laid plan to move big-time into mirrorless. Can a pro camera with high megapixels be far off?

Canon has also announced a compelling lens line rollout.

Canon offerings might not show below here initially, please use links above.

 

B&H Deal ZoneDeals by Brand/Category/Savings
Deals expire in 131 min unless noted. Certain deals may last longer.
$1632 SAVE $700 = 28.0% $165 GIFT CARD LG C8PUA 55" Class HDR UHD Smart OLED TV in Electronics: Televisions
$3097 SAVE $200 = 6.0% $77 FREE ITEMS Nikon D850 DSLR in Cameras: DSLR
$1797 SAVE $200 = 10.0% Pentax K-1 Mark II DSLR in Cameras: DSLR
$998 SAVE $400 = 28.0% Sony a7 II Mirrorless in Cameras: Mirrorless
$1798 SAVE $200 = 10.0% Sony a7R II Mirrorless in Cameras: Mirrorless
$3998 SAVE $500 = 11.0% Sony a9 Mirrorless in Cameras: Mirrorless
$799 SAVE $199 = 19.0% Sony DSC-RX100 V in Cameras: Point and Shoot
$5987 SAVE $1839 = 23.0% ZEISS Loxia 5-Lens Bundle in Lenses: Mirrorless
$11594 SAVE $3157 = 21.0% ZEISS Otus ZF.2 3-Lens Bundle in Lenses: DSLR

New “Enhance Details” Feature in Adobe Camera Raw

Adobe has a new Enhance Details feature for raw files (only). I give kudos to Adobe for being absolutely on the right track—use computing power to improve image quality—it’s about time. See Enhance Details in raw images and Enhance Details for how it works technically.

Great idea, frustrating execution (more on that below—a 5X space penalty).

Does it work?

Yes, particularly with lesser lenses.

But with a world-class lens like the Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art, I just about go blind trying to see the difference, which amounts to a very subtle increase in micro contrast—not even worth the trouble. However, there are images where it is very much worth the trouble—the foregoing statement is a general one about image detail with world-class lenses.

Moiré in particular is hugely improved—in the crop below, the building at left and right are hugely improved—toggle to compare. There are subtle and not so subtle improvements all over this image.

Toggle to compare enhanced vs as-shot (actual pixels crop)

A very nice benefit is pushing the pixel quality towards the style of a true color camera, that is, removing most of the color aliasing. See for example “PaceStar Triple Compound...” at right: the text is cleaner and easier to read and less polluted by color aliasing.

This crop is at 200% of actual pixels—the effects are subtle and harder to see at actual pixels.

Toggle to compare enhanced vs as-shot (actual pixels crop)
Relative file sizes for Adobe “Enhance Details”—
5X larger in total for original + enhance DNG

Huge problem (literally)

There is (literally) a huge “catch”: you must first save a monstrously large raw file derived from the original. This is NOT what I want to do in my workflow—I want to check a box and have it do its thing on the original as part of the raw conversion—please Adobe, don’t quintuple the space requirements saving a huge DNG file—I don’t want to turn 10TB of images into 50TB of images—this is workflow insanity. Yes I know that the enhance step will add a few seconds... so what?

I’m all for this sort of technology, but not with the huge hassle of a 5X size penalty. What is Adobe thinking here? Crazy—I’m supposed to turn my 10TB of images into 50TB?

Adobe, give me an option to just incorporate it into my workflow, not force me to save an absurdly large DNG file.

How-to

In Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop, right-click (control-click) for a contextual menu that will process the raw file and save a new DNG file. In Lightroom, something similar as shown below.

Save a DNG with Adobe’s Enhance Image feature, Adobe Camera Raw in Photoshop
Save a DNG with Adobe’s Enhance Image feature, Adobe Lightroom
Organic Lab Tested Full Spectrum CBD
20% off with coupon code diglloyd20 at NuLeafNaturals.com

100% organic non-GMO, no additives or preservatives.
Legal in all 50 states

Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L Aperture Series: Oak Tree Sunstar (Canon EOS R)

See my Canon mirrorless wishlist.

This series evaluates the Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L at 41mm at far distance on the 30-megapixel Canon EOS R with a scene that is tremendously challenging for any lens: extreme contrast including the sun and bright clouds with silhouetted subject matter—a challenge is often present in outdoor shooting.

Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L Aperture Series: Oak Tree Sunstar (Canon EOS R)

The about $2999 Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L performs like the very best prime lenses.

Oak Tree Sunstar and Billowing Clouds
f2 @ 1/8000 sec, ISO 100; 2019-02-10 10:59:06 [altitude 500 ft / 152 m, 50°F / 10°C]
Canon EOS R + Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L USM @ 41mm

[low-res image for bot]

Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L Aperture Series: Bokeh with Out-of-Focus Speculars (Canon EOS R)

See my Canon mirrorless wishlist.

This series evaluates the Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L at 70mm at MOD at medium distance on the 30-megapixel Canon EOS R with out of focus specular highlights, looking at bokeh quality (particularly in outer zones and with stopping down), and secondary color.

Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L Aperture Series: Bokeh with Out-of-Focus Speculars (Canon EOS R)

Don’t walk—run and go get the about $2999 Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L, the finest zoom I have ever tested—exquisite.

Out of Focus Specular Highlights
f2.8 @ 1/8000 sec, ISO 100; 2019-02-10 10:41:42
Canon EOS R + Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L USM @ 70mm

[low-res image for bot]

Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L Aperture Series: Condensation in Taillight (Canon EOS R)

See my Canon mirrorless wishlist.

This series evaluates performance of the Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L at 70mm at MOD (Minimum Object Distance) on the 30-megapixel Canon EOS R. Overall imaging performance is evaluated including visual impact, but particularly secondary color and also focus shift.

It’s a simple shot, but tells us a lot—it speaks volumes about what to expect from the Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L.

Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L Aperture Series: Condensation in Taillight (Canon EOS R)

If you’re a Canon mirrorless shooter, the about $2999 Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L is a must-have, being the finest zoom I have ever tested—exquisite really. I might yet find some weaknesses, but “OMG” is my first impression, similar to when the first Zeiss Otus lens appeared—a revelation in what a zoom could be, and now is. Actually, it is a revelation in what a prime lens (fixed focal length) could be—double wow.

Why is Nikon designing very good but nonetheless consumer grade optics for the Nikon Z7 while Canon has two awesomely pro grade lenses out already? Interesting strategic differences. If Canon delivers a 45+megapixel Canon EOS R, I’d got that way for clearly superior optics.

Condensation in Taillight
f2.8 @ 1/6400 sec, ISO 100; 2019-02-10 11:04:17
Canon EOS R + Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L USM @ 70mm

[low-res image for bot]

Upgrade the memory of your 2018 Mac mini up to 64GB

Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L Aperture Series: Orange Poppy and Chair (Canon EOS R)

See my Canon mirrorless wishlist.

This series evaluates performance of the Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L at 70mm on a close-range scene using the 30-megapixel Canon EOS R. Overall imaging performance is evaluated, including sharpness, bokeh and secondary color.

Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L Aperture Series: Orange Poppy and Chair (Canon EOS R)

If you’re a Canon mirrorless shooter, the about $2999 Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L is a must-have, being the finest zoom I have ever tested—exquisite really. I might yet find some weaknesses, but “OMG” is my first impression, similar to when the first Zeiss Otus lens appeared—a revelation in what a zoom could be, and now is.

Along with the Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L, Canon is delivering lenses so good that the Nikon Z7 lens choices don’t even deserve to be in the discussion—Canon is producing lenses I *want* to own and shoot. Not so with Nikon (Sony has a good mix). The Canon EOS R is only 30 megapixels—but Canon will surely deliver a high megapixel camera at some point. Otherwise, I could see the Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L being the only lens I would need to carry for many purposes. And that is a BFD for anyone looking to simplify and focus on shooting.

Poppy and Chair
f2.8 @ 1/1600 sec, ISO 100; 2019-02-10 11:11:27
[altitude 500 ft / 152 m, 55°F / 12°C, "poppy waving around in wind"]
Canon EOS R + Canon RF 28-70mm f/2L USM @ 70mm

[low-res image for bot]

MacPerformanceGuide.com

Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 APO-Distagon Examples: Snowstorm Lundy Canyon (Nikon D850)

See my Sigma DG HSM Art wishlist.

These examples shot in stormy snowstorm conditions in Lundy Canyon.

I shot this series in part to validate/calibrate my sense of the Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art, which I shot not long after. While this is not a comparison, I offer my perspective on the two lenses here and there as well as general commentary.

Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 APO-Distagon Examples: Snowstorm Lundy Canyon

Include images up to full camera resolution.

f11 @ 1/1600 sec, ISO 64; 2018-12-01 14:54:13
[location “Lundy Canyon camp”, altitude 7000 ft / 2134 m, 26°F / -3°C, diffraction mitigating sharpening, USM{8,50,0}]
NIKON D850 + Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 APO-Distagon

[low-res image for bot]
OWC Mercury Elite Pro Dual 16TB
Up to 24TB

FAST USB 3.1 gen 1 interface +
eSATA + RAID stripe or mirror or independent drives.

Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 APO-Distagon Aperture Series: Sprinter in Snowstorm (Nikon D850)

See my Sigma DG HSM Art wishlist.

This series evaluates performance of the Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 APO-Distagon on a medium distance scene from f/1.4 through f/11. Secondary color is of particular interest.

I shot this series in part to validate what I was seeing with the Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art, on the same trip, thus a context over a week so in which I saw both lenses perform to world-class standards. While this is not a comparison, I offer my perspective on the two lenses.

Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 APO-Distagon Aperture Series: Sprinter in Snowstorm

Include images up to full camera resolution from f/1.4 to f/11.

Mercedes Sprinter in Snowstorm
f1.4 @ 1/1600 sec, ISO 100; 2018-12-01 15:28:49
[location “Lundy Canyon Road”, altitude 7000 ft / 2134 m, 25°F / -3°C]
NIKON D850 + Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 APO-Distagon

[low-res image for bot]

Data transfer speeds up to 2800MB/s

Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Aperture Series: Green Chairs at Sunset, Laws Railroad Museum (Nikon Z7)

See my Sigma DG HSM Art wishlist.

This far distance series evaluates lens performance from f/1.4 through f/11, evaluating sharpness across the frame as well as secondary color correction.

In diglloyd Advanced DSLR*:

Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Aperture Series: Green Chairs at Sunset, Laws Railroad Museum

Include images up to full camera resolution from f/1.4 to f/11 as well as a 3-frame focus stack at f/11.

* The Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art is a DLSR lens, but I shot it on the Nikon Z7 with the Nikon FTZ lens adapter a lot to avoid dealing with focusing errors and to more easily deal with focus shift.

Green Chairs at Sunset, Laws Railroad Museum
f11 @ 0.5 sec, ISO 31; 2018-12-19 16:42:24
[location “Laws Railroad Museum”, altitude 4000 ft / 1219 m, 45°F / 7°C, focus stack 3 frames, LACA corrected, diffraction mitigating sharpening]
NIKON Z7 + Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art

[low-res image for bot]

MacPerformanceGuide.com

Hasselblad Discontinues the Hasselblad X1D

The Hasselblad X1D-50c is discontinued as are all kits with it, except the field kit multi-lens bundle, which presumably is still in stock but soon to go.

Does this mean a Hasselblad X1D Mark II is coming, perhaps with a 100MP sensor?

A camera with a 100 megapixel sensor would need a CPU twice as fast, but really the issue is the severe problem with bootup speed (11 seconds or so)—time to be ready to shoot makes it useless in too many scenarios.

Were I building a Hasselblad X1D system, I’d want all of the 21mm, 30mm, 45mm, 65mm and 80mm lenses. But that’s a pipe dream (cost) and the X1D is just not usable for any kind of responsive shooting unless the camera is left on—the glacially slow bootup time is a severe handicap.

 


Reader Comment: Street Photography Camera

Roy P writes:

For street photography, the Sony RX100 VA is indeed an excellent little camera, and it does really punch way above its class. The Ricoh GR doesn’t float my boat, because it does not have an EVF, and I just don’t like taking pictures at an arm’s length.

A very interesting camera is the new Zeiss ZX1. This looks a lot more exciting than the Sony RX1R II and Leica Q. In addition to its reportage packaging, it could very well end up being a trend setter for camera firmware and user interface of the future (iPhone-like interactions). It goes without saying the optics should be excellent. I’m definitely going to check it out, and this could be my Plan B if the Panasonic S1R + Leica L to M adapter ends up not working well with my favorite M mount primes.

DIGLLOYD: totally agree on the Ricoh GR—lack of an EVF is a non-started for me personally.

As to the Zeiss ZX1, I’m hoping that Zeiss will send me one to test, it is now overdue. With a fixed 35mm f/2 lens, maybe it’s ideal for some, but I tend to like 28mm as an all-arounder. The lens might well be the same as the Sony RX1R II, but if the haptics and usability are better (this point is definitely not a given), then it may be an excellent for one. I for one find using a rear LCD with touch screen a severe anti-usability problem when the light gets dim (presbyopia), so a camera focused on that can never be an all-arounder for me.

Salim M writes:

I'm a long time street photographer. Till recently my favorite setup was my Nikon D800e and then Nikon D810 and the Nikon AF-S 28mm f/1.8 lens.

However, I've been shooting for a year now with the Sony A7R III + Sony FE 28mm f/2. The combination of size, AF ability, sensor DR and all the extra pixels makes this the best street photography setup for my needs. I can always crop to get a tighter shot if I need to. The 28/2 is a decent lens. It's very compact, fast to focus and good enough resolution.

ony's ergonomics are still lacking, that's one thing I do not like about it. It never feels like an extension of your hand the way the D810 feels in my hands. So it's never fun to use but the image quality and compactness is great. It allows me to shoot in all kinds of conditions. From very dark street photography to fast moving objects. Maybe once there is a nice compact 28mm f/1.8 S for Nikon Z7/Z6, I might switch over to nikon.

DIGLLOYD: I’d like to see Zeiss Loxia and Zeiss Batis lenses for the Nikon Z7, including an as-yet unreleased 28mm.

On Sony, the Zeiss Loxia 25mm f/2.4 makes a superb lens for street shooting albeit slightly wide and with manual focus (but isn’t that the case with Leica M, the classic 'street' camera?), with gorgeous low light results. The Zeiss Loxia 35mm f/2 and its ultra low distortion seem well suited to 'street', particularly for people shots—its rendering style is pleasing, even it is not the strongest lens technically at f/2.

Sohail K writes:

With recent slew of full-frame mirrorless cameras, it would seem to be an exciting time for photographers. The new offerings are great news if you’re a landscape or studio based photographer. But many of new cameras strike me as being far too big for my purposes: street, documentary and travel photography.

I still have a Leica Q which seems to me to be the best all-round camera for portability, image quality and discreetness. It’s not perfect of course.

Is there anything currently available or on the horizon that you think could be an optimum fit for street/travel/documentary photography? Rumor has it the RX1R Mark 3 could launch soon. In the meantime, I’m still hoping that your other wish (way back) of a series of fixed-lens compact cameras (in 50mm, 85mm etc) come true too.

DIGLLOYD: the Leica Q is certainly a good, albeit very expensive choice. The latest Leica CL might be a good choice, but my impressions of the original CL were frustration in usability and it is insanely overpriced.

My thoughts turn to Micro 4/3, possibly the Olympus E-M1 Mark II or perhaps the Olympus PEN series. Because street photography IMO means that image stabilization with fast and accurate focusing is a huge plus, and megapixels not so much.

OTOH, why not a Fujifilm GFX-50R with Fujifilm GF 45m f/2.8 or even the FUJIFILM GF 32-64mm f/4? All black and reasonably discreet and not much more costly than a Leica Q. But definitely larger and heavier.

For just solid performance and super lightweight, the Ricoh GR or the Sony RX100 VA come to mind as cameras that punch way beyond their weight class.

Jimmy B writes:

I've own Ricoh GR for years, but since I got a LeicaQ last month, I don't feel like using the Ricoh GR much. I love how I can shoot now wide open loving everything in the resulting image with the Leica Q.

A possible future generation of a series of Leica Q equipped with a better sensor, and I would be shooting Leica over 90% of the time.

DIGLLOYD: that’s a strong endorsement of the Leica Q. I’d have no issue shooting one myself, assuming the original bugs I ran into while climbing Mt Dana are fixed—the Leica Q does make beautiful images, even if its outer zones disappoint. I totall agree that IBIS would be a great addition to the Q, and so would a 24/28/35 Tri-Elmar design.

OTOH, the Ricoh GR costs about 1/8 as much. Its images can be exceptional and far superior when using leaf-shutter flash fill for natural outdoor portraits and ultra close focus capability; see this series of Ricoh GR images and these portraits. How much is expectation based on price and the red dot cachet? OTOH, I’m not satisfied with even 24 megapixels any more, since an 8K display requires 33 megapixels—I want all my images henceforth to be able to fill an 8K display—it takes the same effort to shoot 16 or 24 or 36 or 50 megapixels.

f/2.8 @ 1/250 sec handheld, ISO 100
Ricoh GR with fill flash at -1.7
f/9 @ 1/1500 sec handheld, ISO 100 +1.4 push
Ricoh GR with fill flash at -1.7
f8 @ 1/160 sec, ISO 100; 2015-07-11 12:39:55
LEICA Q (Typ 116) + 28.0 mm f/1.7

[low-res image for bot]
f4 @ 1/100 sec, ISO 100; 2015-07-11 14:10:24
LEICA Q (Typ 116) + 28.0 mm f/1.7

[low-res image for bot]
Sony FE 400mm f/2.8 GM OSS
Only 6.4 lb / 2.9 kg! 3 Fluorite Elements, 1 ED Element, nano coating, 11 blade diaphragm, weather sealed

Brain-Saver: Sony Noise-Canceling Headphones

I’ve always been (psychological term) a “highly sensitive” person, wired to be aware of sensory perceptions much more than most people—to the point where others don’t even know what I’m talking about—something that can be a benefit, but also a hassle.

Sony WH-1000XM3 Wireless Noise-Canceling Over-Ear Headphones

Noise can be a serious stressor, but after my March 2018 concussion it remains a challenge, particularly if I’m tired. I can walk into a grocery store and be (not always but sometimes if tired) stomped upon by noise, unable to tune out 5 or 6 independent noise sources, all streaming in without being able to tune it out—stuff most people aren’t even aware of becuase the brain auto-eliminates it—I just have to exit. Home is no longer relaxing—constant airplanes overhread, lawnmowers and leaf blowers, traffic, refrigerators, loudmouth people having dialogue 100 yards away, the inconsiderate who idles a vehicle for half an hour, etc. New home construction next door will be sheer hell for 12 to 18 months, so I may have to stay away from home a lot—my Mercedes Sprinter van is my fallback—leave when I can. In the mountains, all I have to deal with is wind and owls or birds or a running creek—takes a huge stressor away. But enough of that—it’s to explain the priority that eliminating noise has in my life—I still feel lucky as hell and plenty of people have far worse issues to deal with. And my tolerance is steadily increasing as my brain continues to recover; I’m thinking 2 years will be the recovery time from my concussion.

Enter noise canceling headphones. After my concussion, the Sony WH-1000XM2 headphones were a brain-saver, particularly when driving. Since then, I’ve migrated to the Sony WH-1000XM3 Wireless Noise-Canceling Over-Ear Headphones. The sound quality (when I listen to music which I can tolerate, something about single sound streams) is terrific. The noise canceling is first rate.

If you’ve had a concussion in particular, I strongly recommend taking the load off your brain with these headphones. Even without a concussion noise can be a serious stressor that adds up over time—e.g., an open office environment (surely designed by those ignorant of perceptual differences, or ignorant of the stress that noise can cause).

For those who have not used noise-canceling headphone: noise cancellation works on steady background noise; it does not eliminate sporadic or intermittent sounds. That’s both good and bad. Use earplugs in addition when there are noises that don’t get cancelled out.

Ron G writes:

I have found the ear protection that shooters wear to work well for noise elimination. E.g., https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/rangemaxx-maxx-muff-folding-earmuffs. Combine that with earplugs and you will not hear anything: A much better choice than noise cancelling headphones in my opinion.

DIGLLOYD: these are inexpensive and look good for just blocking noise in general. Which has its uses, for sure, but doesn't really work for general use:

  • The dampening shuts everything out, making them dangerous for driving or anything where some level of awareness is needed. Sony noise canceling headphones can be adjusted to full reduction or some intermediate level.
  • The Sony headphones adjust noise cancellation for the exact environment, including altitude (air pressure), hair and head type, etc—it actually measures the sounds and adjusts accordingly.
  • The Sony headphones can be used without noise cancellation, e.g., just like regular headphones.
  • I don’t listen to music much, but I do listen to audiobooks a lot. It seems very unwise to just shut everything out while driving, plus it’s boring (no audio of any kind).
  • The Sony headphones are rated for 29.9B attenuation, verus 28 dB for the plain ear muffs.
  • It’s not clear to me how plain ear muffs do on low frequencies; they might be optimized for high frequencies.
  • With the Sony headphones, I can raise a hand to one ear and all the canceling instantly shuts off. They also work with phone calls.
  • The plain earmuffs look to be considerably heavier and bulkier. It’s one thing to wear them shooting or cutting wood, another to sit at a computer for hours.
  • The Sony's come in a compact case for travel.
Fast and cost effective way to backup!

Site Thumbnail Feature

There is a new site feature: thumbnail pages. It is restricted to a maximum of 12 images unless logged-in (subcribe to login).

Clicking an innocuous link on pages of examples will go to a thumbnails page which has quite a lot of useful functionality for browsing images including up to full screen resolution on an iMac 5K—very handy for scrolling through examples quickly. The link looks like this on pages that have it:

Links on blog pages generally do not offer this feature, but here is a live example nonetheless:

View thumbnails for 2019 blog images

Use full-screen mode for the best viewing experience, preferably on an iMac 5K.

What a page of thumbnails looks like at diglloyd.com

Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Examples: Lundy Canyon Portraits (Nikon D850)

See my Sigma DG HSM Art wishlist.

These examples shot in Lundy Canyon in December 2018. They are all personal images of my daughter and/or my daughter and/or myself. I present them as highly relevant to anyone looking for one of the best lenses for people photography that I’ve ever had the pleasure of using.

In diglloyd Advanced DSLR:

Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Examples: Lundy Canyon Portraits

Include images up to full camera resolution.

At about $1399, the Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art offers one of the finest optical performances I’ve ever seen at 1/3 the price of a Zeiss Otus. I recommend it not only for the Nikon D850, but also for the Nikon Z7 (with Nikon FTZ lens adapter).

f5.6 @ 1/125 sec, ISO 100; 2018-12-18 15:59:04
[location “Lundy Canyon”, altitude 7600 ft / 2316 m, 35°F / 1°C]
NIKON D850 + Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art

[low-res image for bot]

Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Aperture Series: Blowing Snow on High Peaks (Nikon D850)

See my Sigma DG HSM Art wishlist.

This far distance series evaluates lens performance from f/1.4 through f/11, evaluating sharpness across the frame as well as secondary color correction.

In diglloyd Advanced DSLR:

Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Aperture Series: Blowing Snow on High Peaks (Nikon D850)

Include images up to full camera resolution from f/1.4 to f/11.

Separately, I look at flare with the Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art, and the value of shading the lens from non-image-forming sunlight:

Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Flare

Blowing Snow on High Peaks
f1.4 @ 1/8000 sec, ISO 31; 2018-12-17 11:24:27
[location “Lundy Canyon Road”, altitude 6800 ft / 2073 m, 35°F / 1°C]
NIKON D850 + Sigma 40mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art

[low-res image for bot]

Up to 1527MB/s sustained performance

Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon Aperture Series: Old Mining Engine (Nikon Z7)

See my Leica M wishlist.

This page looks at the performance of the Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon on the Nikon Z7 from f/1.4 through f/11, sharpness and field curvature in particular. This scene is particularly instructive in showing the excellent sharpness of the Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon wide open at f/1.4, but in a strongly curved field greatly exaggerated by the too-thick sensor cover glass.

In Guide to Leica*:

Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon Aperture Series: Old Mining Engine (Nikon Z7)

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/1.4 through f/11.

The Zeiss ZM 35/1.4 Distagon delivers sharpness edge to edge on the 24-megapixel Leica M240 with its 0.8mm sensor cover glass. However, when adapting it to mirrorless cameras like the Nikon Z7, optical performance can be degraded considerably as shown in MTF on Mirrorless Cameras. The Nikon Z7 offers somewhat thinner sensor cover glass than Sony mirrorless, so the Zeiss ZM 35/1.4 might be expected to be somewhat less degraded, but the sensor cover glass still exerts a strong influence.

* See Which Content is in WHICH PUBLICATION?.

Old Mining Engine
f8 @ 1/80 sec, ISO 31; 2018-12-20 14:51:42
[location “Old mine near Eureka Dunes”, altitude 4000 ft / 1219 m, 45°F / 7°C, USM{10,50,0}]
NIKON Z7 + 0.0 mm f/0.0 @ 2mm equiv (35mm)

[low-res image for bot]

Data transfer speeds up to 2800MB/s

Data transfer speeds up to 2800MB/s

diglloyd Inc. | FTC Disclosure | PRIVACY POLICY | Trademarks | Terms of Use
Contact | About Lloyd Chambers | Consulting | Photo Tours
RSS Feeds | Twitter
Copyright © 2019 diglloyd Inc, all rights reserved.