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Leica 50mm f/2 APO-Summicron-M ASPH: Aperture Series 'Sagging Barn'

In Guide to Leica:

Aperture Series 50/2 APO: Sagging Barn near Pine Creek (M240)

Also update is the 50/2 APO left/right lens skew series.

  Sagging Barn Leica M Typ 240 + Leica 50mm f/2 APO-Summicron-M ASPH @ f/2
Sagging Barn
Leica M Typ 240 + Leica 50mm f/2 APO-Summicron-M ASPH @ f/2

Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon: Ideal Match for the Leica M Typ 240

Pre-order Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (black) or Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (silver) for Leica M at B&H Photo.

Gene F writes:

... in regard to my recent coverage of the Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon:

Your Zeiss 35 shots vindicate the M240.

All of your rigs deliver nice photos and express your style, but these are something else. They have a timeless character I can't put my finger on. The B&W conversions are filmic and lush. I much prefer them to the Nikon D810 look.

It might not be something measurable either; the Zeiss just seems to bring out the better, unique traits of the M240 sensor, which has a certain brilliance and warmth I've grown to appreciate even with my usual Leica lenses.

DIGLLOYD: as I progressed through the images from my 2-week trip, a feeling began to build right away with my initial images, but I pushed back on it, not wanting to jump to conclusions too fast or without enough breadth and depth of material (and there is much more I have not published and needs some attention).

Indeed, not only did the nagging feeling persist (in a good way), it burst into my full awareness recently with the variety of shots I showed towards the end: the ZM 35/1.4 Distagon on the M240 is a rare and synergistic combination that achieves something extraordinary. And while I have all of the best M lenses, none of them quite produce that reaction. So Gene’s comment is spot-on. I think the ZM 35/1.4 Distagon is the very best lens available today for the M240. And it’s gorgeous in silver (the finish I had in hand—my own copy is on order).

There are at least two things that are of keen interest to me in Leica M land: a rumored M240 'Monochrom' (presumably with Live View and 24MP) and two key improvements to the M: a 36+ megapixel sensor and a high-res EVF (preferably built-in). There is still no way to achieve the compactness and quality that an M system offers, but those sort of improvements (and the ZM 35/1.4) would be highly attractive. The Sony A7x cameras have too many flaws and except for the Loxia lenses and perhaps a few others (at most), cannot be take seriously in terms of the lens line in performance and build quality (let alone the absurdity of a hard-bang shutter in a 36MP camera).

Sebastian B writes:

These images are among the finest I have seen for quite a while, anywhere.

I feel you have developed an extraordinary sense for the very basics of photography: color, light, sharpness, blur. If I had to describe those pictures with one word, it would be "transparent"—just like standing there and breathing the air. (And I'm sure it's not just the lens!)

DIGLLOYD: I like to blame the lens at least in part, but this past trip I felt especially “tuned in” to my surroundings and perhaps that shows.

Only quite small images are shown here in this blog (compared to the HD and UltraHD sizes shown in my review).

  Brilliant Aspen Looking Towards Bishop CA, September 25, 2014 @ 16:32 Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ1.4
Brilliant Aspen Looking Towards Bishop CA, September 25, 2014 @ 16:32
Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ1.4

Zeiss 21/2.8 Distagon: Focus Shift Assessment

In Guide to Zeiss, I assess focus shift of the Zeiss 21mm f/2.8 Distagon as contrasted with the Nikon alternatives.

Focus Shift Compared: Nikon 20/1.8G vs 14-24/2.8

Get Nikon 20mm f/1.8G at B&H Photo.

Now posted in my review of the Nikon 20mm f/1.8G in DAP is instructive comparison of focus shift with the 20/1.8G vs the 14-24/2.8G.

Focus Shift: 20/1.8G vs 14-24/2.8G (D810)

Includes large crops and apertures from wide open through f/8 for all.

Focus shift is a major practical usage consideration, because lens performance is first and foremost about placing the zone of sharpness in the optimal place. No “fine focus adjust” feature compensates for focus shift (well, it could be done some innovation at Nikon that compensates by aperture).

When I’m asked to compare (for example) the Nikon 20/1.8G to the Nikon 14-24/2.8G, it’s an open-ended and demanding task: should the comparison be done focused as 99% of shooters would do (no compensation for focus shift), or to show the best possible results from each? Because the reality is that a predictable lens or camera for focusing (actual focus and focus shift) is the one that delivers the sharpest images most of the time.

  Where does focus go when the lens is stopped down? Nikon D810 + 20mm f/1.8G @ f/1.8, actual pixels
Where does focus go when the lens is stopped down?
Nikon D810 + 20mm f/1.8G @ f/1.8, actual pixels

Roy P writes:

Hi Lloyd, I’ve been looking at your focus shift comparisons between the Nikon 20/1.8 and the 14-24/2.8 lenses.

ince both these are autofocus lenses and neither is designed for manual focusing, wouldn’t the typical use case be AF? In that case, by definition, wouldn’t the AF focus on the subject always? So why sweat the issue, unless one is determined to use these as manual focus lenses?!

DIGLLOYD: yes of course the usual case is AF, and that’s the guaranteed worst case: the lens focuses wide open, then the shot is made stopped down. On a tripod with manual focus, one can at least focus stopped down slightly to mitigate the error. There is never any issue focusing and shooting at the same aperture.

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Focus Shift Nikon 20/1.8G vs 14-24/2.8

Get Nikon 20mm f/1.8G at B&H Photo.

Very soon I’ll be posting in DAP an instructive comparison of focus shift with the 20/1.8G vs the 14-24/2.8G (in the review of the Nikon 20mm f/1.8G). In my view this is a major factor to consider, because lens performance is first and foremost about focus accuracy; the sharpest lens in the world is not so when focus is off, and no “fine focus adjust” feature compensates for focus shift (well, it could with some innovation at Nikon).

In Guide to Zeiss, the 21/2.8 Distagon will be similarly analyzed.

Apple iMac with 5K Display, Also new MacMini with Dual Thunderbolt 2 Port

More on the late 2014 iMac 5K at MPG.
More on the late 2014 MacMini at MPG.

Diglloyd publications have included the viewing pleasure of UltraHD images for about 18 months now (~3840 wide, 8.3 million pixels). These will fit comfortably on a 5K iMac in their full glory, with room to spare. And thus make me reevaluate my top-end publication size, because a 5K display is 14.7 million pixels, or nearly the entire resolution of many APS-C cameras! Incredible.

  iMac 5K as ordered by MPG
iMac 5K as ordered by MPG

A 4K UltraHD 3840 X 2560 image will easily fit onto an iMac 5K display. The 8.3 million pixels will leave another 6.4 million pixels unused! Click for larger.

  4K UltraHD 3840 X 2560 image as it fits onto an iMac 5K display
4K UltraHD 3840 X 2560 image as it fits onto an iMac 5K display

Bruce Z writes:

Do you think the iMac 5K screen will be able to be profiled as readily as the NEC screens are famous for?

5K images will look great, but we will still need to have the monitor tweak-able with a display calibration system to get the most out of those pixels.

MPG: Any display can be profiled, the question is whether true calibration can be done, or just crummy faux calibration.

Calibration is designating a target output, then adjusting the display itself to match that target as closely as possible, ideally with < 1 delta E accuracy using 14-bit adjustments internal to the display. Contrast that with 8-bit numbers on a video card which are adjusted (mangled) to achieve something “sorta accurate”—that is faux calibration. Ask yourself how 2/3/4/5-bit numbers (dark tones) could ever be properly adjusted: there is no dark gray having value 13.7, only a choice of 13 or 14 (crudely stepped/rounded). OS X graphics drivers are still only 8 bit, not even 10 bit, which makes matters worse.

Once a display is calibrated properly (or faux-calibrated), its actual performance—what it actually produces for the designated target (gamma, grayscale, color, etc)—is characterized with a display profile (profiling).

All iMacs including the new iMac 5K can be profiled, but cannot be calibrated. So the iMac will still have faux calibration along with a shiny screen which is not good for print matching. Beautiful to behold, but not a professional-grade tool, especially over time and temperature changes. For professionals doing work where color accuracy matters (and consistency over time matters), the NEC PA322UHD is a far superior choice.

Nikon 20mm f/1.8G ED vs Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8G zoom

Get Nikon 20mm f/1.8G at B&H Photo.

Several readers have asked about the new 20mm f/1.8G versus the Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8G zoom (bulky and bulbous and heavy), noting the size/weight/filter issues of the zoom.

I don’t look at size and weight as the top issues, though the 20/1.8 is really a joy to carry compared to the 14-24, and that alone is a huge plus for many users. And it takes standard filters. But the 14mm - 18mm range and 24mm range is eminently flexible.

My main issue with the 14-24 is its challenging peripheral-forward and central-rearward focus shift, as I’ve documented in multiple case studies in Making Sharp Images (and in its review). The 14-24 is a very sharp lens, but if sharpness won’t stay where you put it (moves its peak zone by aperture), then it’s often sub-optimal (mediocre) where intended. Particularly at f/5.6 which is a very important aperture for me. The 20/1.8 might have its own quirks, but I don’t have all the answers yet.

  Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8G   Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED
Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8G ED and Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20/1.8G ED
(not to scale)

Zeiss Loxia 35/2 and 50/2 In Hand

  Sony Alpha A7R
Zeiss Loxia mounts on
Sony Alpha A7S / A7 / A7R
(and others)

Pre-Order Zeiss Loxia lenses at B&H Photo.

The two new Zeiss Loxia lenses incorporate proven Zeiss designs into all-metal manual focusing lens bodies for the full-frame Sony Alpha A7/A7R system.

I now have the 35/2 and 50/2 Zeiss Loxia lenses in hand. From an ergonomics standpoint alone they are terrific, and these are the lenses I would choose as a Sony A7s/A7/A7R shooter for many purposes.

The Loxia lenses are extremely well built, an entirely better feel in the hand than the plasticky Sony/Zeiss 35/2.8 and 55/1.8 designs.

The manual focus throw of 180° is silky smooth and far superior to the autofocus Sony/Zeiss cousins. With the EVF on the Sony bodies, manual focus should be fast and precise given the excellent “throw” and the smooth feel.

See also the initial coverage of Zeiss Loxia in Guide to Mirrorless.

  Zeiss Loxia 50mm f/2 Planar T*
Zeiss Loxia 50mm f/2 Planar T*

Nikon 20mm f/1.8G ED Aperture Series at MOD: Multi-Stem Sunflower and Blue Sky

Get Nikon 20mm f/1.8 at B&H Photo.

  Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED
Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20/1.8G ED

In my review of the Nikon 20/1.8G in DAP is a more moderate distance series which complements the MOD series. As with that series, bokeh and rendering style are the focus.

Aperture Series: Multi-Stem Sunflower and Blue Sky (D810)

Includes the ƒ/1.8 - ƒ/11 aperture range in HD and UltraHD sizes as well as large crops across that full range.

  October Sunflower  Nikon D810 + AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED @ ƒ/1.8
October Sunflower
Nikon D810 + AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED @ ƒ/1.8

Nikon 20mm f/1.8G ED: Distortion

  Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED
Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20/1.8G ED

Get Nikon 20mm f/1.8G at B&H Photo.

In my review of the Nikon 20/1.8G in DAP are presented two examples and the ACR distortion correction settings for correcting the distortion in the Nikon 20mm f/1.8G.

Nikon 20mm f/1.4G Distortion, and Distortion Correction

Nikon 20mm f/1.8G ED Aperture Series at MOD: Sunflower Blossom

Get Nikon 20mm f/1.8 at B&H Photo.

  Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED
Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20/1.8G ED

In my review of the Nikon 20/1.8G in DAP is a MOD (minimum object distance) aperture series assessing bokeh and rendering style, because it’s great fun shooting an ultra wide at close range.

Aperture Series: Sunflower Blossom (D810)

Includes the full ƒ/1.8 - ƒ/16 range in HD and UltraHD sizes as well as large crops across that full range.

  October Sunflower  Nikon D810 + AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED @ ƒ/1.8
October Sunflower
Nikon D810 + AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED @ ƒ/1.8

A First Look at the Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED

Get Nikon 20mm f/1.8 at B&H Photo.

  Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED
Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20/1.8G ED

Kicking off my review of the Nikon 20/1.8G in DAP:

The aperture series includes the full ƒ/1.8 - ƒ/16 range in HD and UltraHD sizes as well as large crops across that full range.

This particular series was shot at very close range, about 16 inches from the green pumpkin.

  Green and Orange Pumpkins Nikon D810 + AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED @ ƒ/2
Green and Orange Pumpkins
Nikon D810 + AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED @ ƒ/2

Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED

Get Nikon 20mm f/1.8 at B&H Photo.

I shot the 20mm f/1.8 today on the Nikon D810. A fun lens to be sure.

Coverage soon in DAP.

Update: the 20/1.8G is driving me crazy with pronounced errors in exposure value (EV). In series after series, it is off as much 1.5 stops in some apertures versus others, e.g., ƒ/5.6 @ 1/60 might be a full stop too dark (or more) than ƒ/2.8 @ 1/250. Having only one sample, I cannot know if this is the particular sample, or some general trait. Shooting manually of course, so there can be no error in EV calculation. Fixed ISO, equivalent EV as in my wont when shooting an aperture series.

  Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED
Nikon AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G ED

Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon: a Study in Quaking Aspen

Pre-order Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (black) or Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (silver) for Leica M at B&H Photo.

A wide variety of quaking aspen images with the ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon.

Examples Quaking Aspen Variety (M240)

With HD and UltraHD images, and large crops.

  Brilliant Aspen Looking Towards Bishop CA, September 25, 2014 @ 16:32 Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ1.4
Brilliant Aspen Looking Towards Bishop CA, September 25, 2014 @ 16:32
Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ1.4


Sebastian B writes:

These images are among the finest I have seen for quite a while, anywhere.

I feel you have developed an extraordinary sense for the very basics of photography: color, light, sharpness, blur. If I had to describe those pictures with one word, it would be "transparent"—just like standing there and breathing the air. (And I'm sure it's not just the lens!)

DIGLLOYD: I like to blame the lens at least in part, but this past trip I felt especially “tuned in” to my surroundings and perhaps that shows.

Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon: More Field Examples

Pre-order Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (black) or Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (silver) for Leica M at B&H Photo.

I’ve added some more examples with the ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon.

Examples Yosemite continued (M240)

With HD and UltraHD images, and large crops.

Toggle to compare, click for larger size.

  Drought-killed Trout, Late September 2014 Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ5.6
Drought-killed Trout, Late September 2014
Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ5.6

How many thousands of years has this bristlecone staged this same view towards the Sierra Nevada? Possibly “only” a thousand years before Christ, which would mean it died early.

Toggle to compare, click for larger size.

  Ancient Bristlcone Pine View Towards Sierra Nevada, One year of Thousands Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ1.4
Ancient Bristlecone Pine View Towards Sierra Nevada, One year of Thousands
Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ1.4

No One Wants to Buy my Leica 35/1.4 Summilux-M ASPH

Leica 35mm f/1.4 Summilux-M ASPH
Leica 35mm f/1.4 Summilux-M ASPH

I wonder why at $1000 off new, no one wants to buy my Summilux.

My Leica 35mm f/1.4 Summilux-M ASPH (black) is for sale, the 2010 FLE (latest/current design).

This is the lens with which all my review has been done. Lightly used and in excellent working order with perfect glass.

$4150 in Leica leather case in original box (sells for $5150 new).

Contact me. Buyer pays FedEx insured shipping of choice.

Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon Aperture Series: Granite Glacial Polish to Cloud’s Rest

Pre-order: ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (black) or ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (silver).

A difficult scene in lighting terms, this series complements the 'Exfoliating Granite and High Cloud Sun Drama' example by using a medium-distance focus to study foreground and background bokeh, and how real (actual) depth of field progresses.

Aperture Series: Granite Glacial Polish to Cloud’s Rest (M240)

With HD and UltraHD images and large crops in color and black and white, from ƒ/1.4 through ƒ/16 along with large crops.

Toggle to compare or click for larger image.

  Granite Glacial Polish to Cloud’s Rest Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ/11
Granite Glacial Polish to Cloud’s Rest
Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ/11

Dr. Bob writes:

Perhaps having grown up in an era where one could take black and white photos and immediately go to your favorite darkroom for developing and printing has caused me to rethink how I process photos. During my high school days in the late 1960's I had access to a fully stocked photo-junky darkroom at a local high school (yes they did exist). At the time I was an avid astro-photographer and the ability to push the ASA in my black and white images was a great advantage.

Today the cost of a D810 and quality lenses puts a ton of camera power in a lot of people's hands. One can get admirable results in color but in the past few years I have been converting many into black and white. One can accomplish this by a few keystrokes but the process of using a variety of filters, gradients and the like makes it even more interesting.

Your image is so much more dramatic in black and white that I didn't realize at first there was a color "toggle."

I suppose the real beauty of the accuracy of a higher MP cam and a killer lens is the ability to eek out the most subtle tonal gradient pixel to pixel and, in so doing, the subtle beauty that one can see with the naked eye. Again, thanks for the black and whites.

DIGLLOYD: I also spent many an hour in the darkroom in high school.

Indeed, digital today eclipses what I could ever do with black and white film, and I love being able to apply filters after making the image as well as having both color and B&W options.

There is a rumored Leica M240 Monochrom (24 megapixels presumably), but it will assuredly cost $8K or so. And based on prior comparisons of the Nikon D800E and the Leica M Monochrom, the D810 will still be on my short list for B&W, not an M240 Monochrom. I expect the D810 to outperform on noise and dynamic range in particular, which for B&W is most important. Resolution will likely be similar.

  Exfoliating Granite and High Cloud Sun Drama Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ/1.4
High Clouds over Granite Dome
Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ/1.4

Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon: I rate it the best M Lens Available

Pre-order: ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (black) or ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (silver).

Over the past five years I’ve shot nearly all the Leica M lenses, and I own all of the best ones, including the 50/2 APO and the Noctilux and the best M wides.

With further review of the images from my 2 weeks of intensive field use, it is now my view that the Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon is the best lens available today for the Leica M platform, because it offers a magical combination of sharpness and contrast, f/1.4 speed, gorgeous bokeh, superb control of aberrations, minimal field curvature and no focus shift. In my hands, its ergonomics are also far preferable: I hugely dislike the Leica “tab” focusing, and the Zeiss 1/3 click stops stay firm and distinct with use versus sloppy and loose all too often with Leica M. My comments ignore cost but that the ZM 35/1.4 costs 1/2 or 1/3 or 1/4 as much as the best Leica M designs is hardly a point to ignore.

Certainly “best” incorporates one’s own preferences and so there is room for some reasoned disagreement here. But if I could shoot only one lens on Leica M, my choice is the ZM 35/1.4 Distagon.

Zeiss offers the 35/1.4 in black or silver. I think it looks terrific in silver, based on firsthand usage, and that’s the finish I’ll likely be buying when it ships in December.

  The best lens for Leica M? Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon, available in black or silver finish
The best lens for Leica M?
Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon, available in black or silver finish

Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon: Aperture Series 'Exfoliating Granite and High Cloud Sun Drama'

Pre-order: ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (black) or ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (silver).

An infinity-focus scene is a demanding test where lens weaknesses are seen at their maximum. If present, field curvature, optical asymmetries, etc all pop out like mushrooms after a rain. In my testing over the years, many if not most lenses fail in some way at this test.

The ZM 35/1.4 Distagon exemplifies the very best I have seen for a 35mm lens.

Aperture Series: 'Exfoliating Granite and High Cloud Sun Drama' (M240)

With HD and UltraHD images and large crops in color and black and white, from ƒ/1.4 through ƒ/16 along with large crops.

Toggle to compare or click for larger image.

  Exfoliating Granite and High Cloud Sun Drama Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ/1.4
Exfoliating Granite and High Cloud Sun Drama
Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ/1.4

Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon: More Field Examples

Pre-order Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (black) or Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (silver) for Leica M at B&H Photo.

More examples with the incredible Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon. If you’re a Leica M user, this lens is a must-have.

Examples Yosemite continued (M240)

With HD and UltraHD images, and large crops.

  Granite Glory, Late September Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ/1.4
Granite Glory, Late September
Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ/1.4

6-way Shootout at 35mm: Zeiss ZM 35/1.4 Distagon, 35/2 Biogon, 35/2.8 C-Biogon, Voigtlander Nokton 35/1.2, Leica 35/1.4 Summilux, Leica 35/2 Summicron

Pre-order Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (black) or Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon (silver) for Leica M at B&H Photo.

This 6-way comparison includes extensive commentary on the practical merits of these six lenses using a subject that is revealing of key lens behaviors.

I found it very useful myself, and for anyone considering a 35mm lens for Leica M, I deem it worth the price of Guide to Leica alone for what it reveals.

6-way Shootout at 35mm: Wyman Cabin (M240)

With HD and UltraHD images, along with large crops, from ƒ/1.4 through ƒ/16.

Zeiss ZM 35/1.4 Distagon   Zeiss ZM 35/2 Biogon   Zeiss ZM 35/2.8 C-Biogon  
Voigtlander Nokton 35/1.2 II ASPH Leica 35mm f/1.4 Summilux-M ASPH   Leica 35mm f/2 Summicron-M ASPH
Zeiss ZM 35/1.4 Distagon
Zeiss ZM 35/2 Biogon
Zeiss ZM 35/2.8 C-Biogon
Voigtlander Nokton 35/1.2 II ASPH
Leica 35mm f/1.4 Summilux-M ASPH
Leica 35mm f/2 Summicron-M ASPH
(not to scale)
  Wyman Canyon Cabin Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ/4
Wyman Canyon Cabin
Leica M Typ 240 + Zeiss ZM 35mm f/1.4 Distagon @ ƒ/4

Big Storage for Video or Photography: 4TB, 5TB, 6TB Hard Drives

Storage prices have been dipping, with 5TB drives now the same cost as 4TB drives.

Details over at MacPerformanceGuide.com.

High capacity hard drive prices
High capacity hard drive prices

Especially used as a RAID-5 (striping + parity for fault tolerance), drive speed with hard drives is now at excellent levels. With a unit like the OWC Thunderbay, it’s possible to run 4 single drives, RAID-5, RAID-1, RAID-0, etc.

5TB hard drive speed
5TB hard drive speed

Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 APO-Planar: Full MTF Series from f/1.4 - f/16

Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 APO-Planar (about $4490) for Nikon or Canon.

Now up in Guide to Zeiss in the review of the Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 APO-Planar: MTF with commentary for the full aperture range from ƒ/1.4 to ƒ/16.

Performance that sets a new benchmark, a fact that field shots prove over and over again.

  MTF for Zeiss ZF.2 / ZE at infinity with white light, 10/20/40 lp/mm
MTF for Zeiss ZF.2 / ZE at infinity with white light, 10/20/40 lp/mm
MEASURED RESULTS WITH REAL LENS

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