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Sony FE 24-70mm f/2.8 GM II: Initial Comments

Sony FE 24-70mm f/2.8 GM II

By good fortune (mistake) not one but two samples of the Sony FE 24-70mm f/2.8 GM II showed up on my doorstep.

My review is going to get off to a slow start, but I plan on covering the lens in depth. Tonight my first foray into how it performs.

Immediate impression is of ultra high image quality, similar to the impressive results obtained with other recent Sony FE lenses, like the Sony FE 12-24mm f/2.8 GM, Sony FE 35mm f/1.4 GM, Sony FE 50mm f/1.2 GM.

All of which show stunningly high potential, and all of which also show that getting a really good sample is a major effort likely to defy most of us, including me. There is just a darned lot of variation. The Sony MTF charts are computer-generated fantasies; no real lens will deliver those results symmetrically across the field. OTOH, a good sample looks to deliver the results across ~3/4 of the field. This is not news and by no means specific to Sony.

Already it is apparent that the potential of the Sony FE 24-70mm f/2.8 GM II is world-class—eye poppingly crisp where it works. If it were possible to get a really superb symmetric sample, I’m all in on that one-lens-to-carry proposition.

And already it is apparent that one sample is considerably better than the other at the wide end, both have symmetry issues, some focals have major astigmatism seemingly caused by being “off” a little (aspheric elements are often intolerant of deviations from spec), and both have major outer-zone focus shift such that f/5.6 is worse than f/2.8 at some focal lengths and good luck getting f/8 to fix that fully.

If you focus in the area of interest you’ll likely be pleased—very pleased—with your new wonder lens. But for challenging subjects like a distant landscape scene, all the “warts” of your particular sample (varying by focal length) are going to crop up like mushrooms after a drenching. Optical tradeoffs in lens design yield both spectacularly good performance and annoying bulges and shifts in where sharpness impacts.

My recommendation is to find a sample that you like at one end and the middle. For me that would be the 24mm to 50mm range. For example, I was pretty happy with the Fujifilm GF 35-70m f/4.5-5.6 in the 35mm to 60mm range, and quite disappointed at 70mm (weak left side). That’s the rule for most all zoom lenses—a really good sample will be strong over 2/3 of the focal length range, and acceptable to annoying at the other end.

REVIEWED: Apple Mac Studio M1 Ultra — Now with Updated Results for Photoshop CC 23.4.1 — Big Speed Improvements

Consult with Lloyd on your computer or photographic purchase, backup strategy, archival and storage strategy, etc.

A big thank-you to B&H Photo for sending the $7999 Apple Mac Studio M1 Ultra 20-core CPU / 64-core GPU/ 128GB / 8TB SSD for review. This is exactly the configuration I would buy excepting a preference for a 4TB SSD (only to keep the cost down).

The release of Photoshop CC 2022 v23.4.1 vaporized most of the performance problems with Photoshop CC 2022 v23.3.2, literally overnight.

The Apple Mac Studio M1 Ultra now looks to be the fastest Photoshop Mac ever made, particularly for raw file conversion. My 2019 Mac Pro never looks so dated.

Adobe has improved raw file conversion speed considerably since early 2022.

CLICK TO VIEW: Apple Mac Studio at B&H Photo

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Convert 100 Sony A7R IV 60-megapixel raw flies to JPEG
2022 Mac Studio M1 Ultra vs, 2019 iMac 5K, 2019 Mac Pro
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Adobe Releases Photoshop CC 23.4.1 — FIXES Serious Performance Bugs on Apple Mac Studio M1 Ultra

Consult with Lloyd on your computer or photographic purchase, backup strategy, archival and storage strategy, etc.

A big thank-you to B&H Photo for sending the $7999 Apple Mac Studio M1 Ultra 20-core CPU / 64-core GPU/ 128GB / 8TB SSD for review. This is exactly the configuration I would buy excepting a preference for a 4TB SSD (only to keep the cost down).

With today’s release of Photoshop CC 2022 v23.4.1, the performance problems have vaporized, and the M1 Ultra is at least not meaningfully slower than the M1 Max. And a little faster in some cases, meaning about 25% faster than v23.3.2

UPDATE: I’m seeing signs that thermal throttling may be at play in the M1 Ultra, eg a test that over iterations gets slower and slower. I might have to wait until morning to test (it is 90°F in my office). Also, not all tests are faster, but as yet I am unsure if this is temperature related.
diglloydHuge, 20 iterations: average = 20.96 {17.24, 16.53, 16.47, 16.39, 16.28, 16.27, 22.86, 22.84, 22.85, 22.83, 22.84, 22.84, 22.84, 22.85, 22.88, 23.03, 22.85, 22.86, 22.85, 22.87}
UPDATE: does NOT look like thermal throttling. I suspect a memory leak problem now; after running one benchmark (panorama), Photoshop was at 100GB memory usage after 20 iterations, which is absurd. OTOH, the Mac Pro hit 230GB after only 14 iterations. Not sure what Adobe has wrought with this release, but that is beyond absurd.

It does make one wonder if Adobe QC is asleep at the switch, not able to detect something as basic as a 20-core being 25% slower than a 10-core machine. Before shipping the dreck to customers. Dang. But at least things look a lot better now.

Call it good timing or bad?

Terrible timing because I have hours of work ahead to re-test and republish everything related to Photoshop, and on two machines.

GREAT timing because it means I can redo the tests to show what the Apple Mac Studio M1 Ultra can do. Had I sent the Mac Studio back, I’d be left with test results that would have been out of date overnight.

CLICK TO VIEW: Apple Mac Studio at B&H Photo

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Reader Comment: “how best to use the GFX to make more spontaneous, street like photos?”

re: Fujifilm Medium Format eg Fujifilm GFX100S: What’s Missing in Lenses

Reader Claude C writes:

I understand what you say and mean about the GFX being a landscaper’s tool. But, I am curious, interested, trying to figure out how best to use the GFX to make more spontaneous, street like photos. For instance, stop while on a hike and bring the camera up for a handheld photo. A valuable ability.

I have done a few handheld photos, but the operation, at least the way I am doing it, is clumsy, to say the least.

There are a number of operations that I could see being useful. Touch screen focus, tilt screen usage, but I have not tried these or any other shooting variations.

Thoughts?

DIGLLOYD: I shot hundreds of candids with the Fujifilm GFX100S and Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 during my March/April trip with my daughter (few images published, being personal).

I thought it worked well and was pretty quick, though nothing as responsive and rewarding as the Sony A1. Not any fun compared to the A1 (always felt a little laggy and make-work chore-like), but it got the job done well enough. I also did a lot of handheld shooting, such as at the Eureka Dunes and Pine Creek and White Mountains Snow.

CLICK TO VIEW: Lloyd’s Recommended Kit for Fujifilm GFX100S

Not sure what Claude means by “clumsy”... As to the “stop while on a hike and bring the camera up for a handheld photo” that’s easy: AF-ON button and shoot... not sure I understand what is clumsy about that. Well, you do have to have self timer off and FOCUS BKT off, maybe auto-ISO, etc. So while hiking the key is to be able to quickly switch grab-shot settings with tripod-based settings.

CLICK TO VIEW: Lloyd Fujifilm GFX100S System

Fujifilm GFX100S, top view with C1/C2/C2 setting

The biggest hassle was switching between the settings I need for landscape and those I need for handheld shooting—self timer, image stabilization, etc. Sets of settings can be assigned to the C1/C2/C3 at camera top to switch quickly to a different group of settings. Still, it feels darn clumsy; I’d like one something that can just toggle the whole mess. And I don't think those include every setting I needed—I’m forgetting now. But maybe I missed something.

Some things I would mention:

  • IBIS on, auto-ISO, aperture priority.
  • For most shooting, single-shot AF-ON with shutter AF off is what I like. But for quick shooting especially people, turn shutter AF on and use AF lock and recompose.
  • Eye AF for people—maybe. I never used it one my trip however, using instead small-spot AF—one more thing to change/unchange for my mixed usage. I might be wrong, but I am dubious that such an underpowered camera can do good Eye AF, since even my A1 messes up sometimes. And AF is sluggish enough as it is (compared to the A1) and already dubious with an f/4.5-5.6 lens. I got many fine shots using small-spot AF without having to guess whether the camera figured it out.
  • Focus can be spot or wide. If the situations are unpredictable, then wider AF might be fine, but I stick to spot AF due to too many focus errors. Which still happen on the GFX100S even with spot. But at least spot AF is without the variable of what the camera decided to focus on, since the spot is placed by me.
  • Touch screen for 'street' or any handheld doesn't make sense to me—holding camera at arm’s length. Tilt screen for low-POV shots... I just like to keep things simple for quick shooting, so I see both as pointless 99% of the time.

Maybe I’m missing something obvious and therefore not thinking of it?

f9 @ 1/45 sec handheld IBIS=on electronic shutter, ISO 1600; 2022-03-31 19:08:17
Fujifilm GFX100S + Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR @ 39.5mm equiv (48.2mm)
ENV: Eureka Dunes, altitude 3100 ft / 945 m, 60°F / 15°C
RAW: LACA corrected, distortion corrected, vignetting corrected, push 0.3 stops, +30 Shadows, +10 Clarity, diffraction mitigating sharpening

[low-res image for bot]

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Fujifilm GF Lenses: Rebates are Back!

re: Fujifilm Medium Format eg Fujifilm GFX100S: What’s Missing in Lenses

The perennial shortage of Fujifilm GF lenses has eased a little, and even better, rebates* are back. Click through to see current pricing and availability as it might not be up to the minute (updated every 24 hours).

* Mail-in rebates, which everyone despises (takes too long, gets lost, extra hassle, makes you marketing fodder, etc), but Fujifilm remains clueless on how much they are hated. But it's better than paying full price.

CLICK TO VIEW: Lloyd’s Recommended Kit for Fujifilm GFX100S

Needs vary, but click on the list above to see what I recommend for landscape and similar usage.

Below, the full Fujifilm GF system. Click through for current pricing.

Lloyd Fujifilm GFX100S System

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Is the Apple Mac Studio M1 Ultra the Ultimate Photo Workstation?

Consult with Lloyd on your computer or photographic purchase, backup strategy, archival and storage strategy, etc

Based on experience with the M1 Max in the Apple MacBook Pro M1 Max, the Apple Mac Studio M1 Ultra might be the quickest and most powerful Mac for photo every produced, and not by a little.

But no more guessing: it’s here tomorrow for testing!

Apple Mac Studio M1 Ultra Coming Soon for Testing

See previous comments on the Apple Mac Studio.

CLICK TO VIEW: Apple Mac Studio at B&H Photo

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Apple Mac Studio: top-end configuration

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Sony A1 vs Sony A7R IVa

re: Best Camera for You? Sony A1 + Sony FE 24-70/2.8 GM II vs Fujifilm GFX100S + Fujifilm GF 35-70/4.5-5.6
re: Best Camera for You? Reader Comments

Far more responsive, instantaneous everything, the Sony A1 is my top pick among 35mm format cameras. Rock solid operationally, gets out of the way, it’s the best camera ever produced IMO, though I’ll allow that the Nikon Z9 might rank too, since I have yet to try it. But... it’s bigger/heavier than I’d want to lug around.

There’s just one small problem for many of us: the Sony A1 is twice the price of the Sony A7R IVa, which is not as responsive, but still a very fine camera—at half the price. Highly recommended, either!

For dedicated landscape use, the Fujifilm GFX100S is the way to go, but it doesn’t have half the enjoyment factor, it’s more like negative enjoyment factor vs the Sony operational feel—I always feel like I’m on the losing end of the design pipeline with the GFX100S because it makes me work way too hard for simple things, even getting optimal focus, let alone image review and finding acceptabl lens samples. Still, its 100MP sensor is unbeatable for landscape. Get it with the Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 if you are the hiker/backpacker type.

CLICK TO VIEW: Fujifilm Sampler

CLICK TO VIEW: Nikon Sampler

CLICK TO VIEW: Canon Sampler

James K writes:

Sony is THE way to go. I am using the Sony A7R IV and I have the same feeling regarding the ease of operation and excellent technical results. The price of the a1 is hard to justify for my uses. Maybe the A2 will ring the right bells.

DIGLLOYD: anyone who thinks the A7R IV is a solid camera is right. But... the A1 blows it away.



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Sony A1 vs Fujifilm GFX100S: the Enjoyment and Ease of Use Factor

re: Best Camera for You? Sony A1 + Sony FE 24-70/2.8 GM II vs Fujifilm GFX100S + Fujifilm GF 35-70/4.5-5.6
re: Best Camera for You? Reader Comments

I took pictures of my daughter the night before her graduation—fortunately! Which she missed because of COVID!

If you have daughters anywhere older than 12, you might know that it’s really hard to please them with pictures of themselves, if they will even consent. My daughter was very pleased.

I chose to shoot with the Sony A1 + Sony FE 50mm f/1.2 GM. You’re just not going to get more pleasin images than that combination, though the Nikon Z9 or Nikon Z7 II + Nikon Nikkor S 50mm f/1.2 S or Canon R5 + Canon RF 50mm f/1.2L would do just as well, I expect.

But my point here is not which 35mm camera might have done as well. It is more that having mostly shot the Fujifilm GFX100S in past months, it was almost a shock to use the Sony A1 and be reminded of just how awesomely pleasant the Sony A1 is vs the GFX100S. Dang, the difference is massive!

CLICK TO VIEW: Fujifilm Sampler

CLICK TO VIEW: Sony Sampler

CLICK TO VIEW: Nikon Sampler

CLICK TO VIEW: Canon Sampler

Far more responsive, instantaneous everything, the Sony A1 just gets out of the way and becomes a tool that’s an extension of the mind. To use a crappy analogy, it’s like driving a Tesla versus a Model T belching clouds of black exhaust.

Does my daughter care that the images are 50MP instead of 100MP? Hell no, and she most likes the f/1.2 through f/2 images, which pop like nothing you can get off the GFX100S.

At this point in the evolution of cameras, the smart move is to consider what your priorities are in terms of enjoyment and ease of use, hit rate (sharp and in focus images), and similar. NOT the megapixels. Obviously there are subjects where those factors can be discounted, e.g., landscape and architecture.

James K writes:

Sony is THE way to go. I am using the Sony A7R IV and I have the same feeling regarding the ease of operation and excellent technical results. The price of the a1 is hard to justify for my uses. Maybe the A2 will ring the right bells.

DIGLLOYD: anyone who thinks the A7R IV is a solid camera is right. But... the A1 blows it away.

Dr S writes:

2 weeks ago Sunday I served as the photographer of a 45 member Choral ensemble for their Spring Concert.  They asked for candids as well as a posed group photo.  The venue was an old church with mile high ceilings but was quite dark inside for available light.  Because of the lack of light and the lack of room to set up appropriate lighting inside, the group photo needed to be taken outside in the courtyard.  Besides, the courtyard was a very attractive setting.

What gear did I decide to take?  To facilitate the interior shots w/o onboard flash I took the Sony A1 w/50mm/1.2.  Why? for just the reasons you stated in your article.  The A1 is snappy, AF excellent, relatively small and lightweight, high MP, a cam that does not get in the way when you need to get a photo.  It is ready when you are and it is reliable!  Besides that the 50mm GM is a great lens.  No issues with the shoot "inside."  I also brought another cam just to see what it would do..... the Fuji GFx100s w/30mm

For the group luckily there was good cloud cover.  Put the GFx on a tripod, arranged the group and just as I was going to take the photo, the sun popped through but not full sun. The areas illuminated were slightly diffused.  But I had to go through with the shoot because it was a pre-concert photo.  There was a time constraint.  Got about 10 shots with the GFx and had them wait until I could mount the Sony, and shoot a couple just in case the Fuji wasn't to my liking.

The result?  The Sony was solid, no issues, and the Fuji was just fine.  Had to do a lot of local adjustments on the group because of the sunlight but the image came out just fine.

Moral?  50mp on a very capable body is, at this point, as good as it gets.  It did not get in the way......an extension of the photographer.  I'm sure there will be improvements in the future but Sony has done a great job.  And there is a place for 100mp especially if needed and wanted.  Yes, I could have brought the A7r4 and just swapped lenses.  More than enough resolution for the group and would have been just fine.

With the GFx I just wanted to see what the MF beast could do.

Lloyd, you are a great source of info and am pleased you wrote that small blog.

DIGLLOYD: cats for rats.


Alpa 12 PANO Rosewood for Panoramic images with PhaseOne IQ4 150 and Similar Digital Backs + Reader Comments

I cannot afford a PhaseOne IQ4 150, nor would I necessarily want such kludgy technology given the far greater ease of use of the Fujifilm GFX100S. At least for most purposes. OTOH, for dedicated landscape... the IQ4 150 has significantly better image quality, including vastly superior capability for monochrome images, as I’ve previously shown (given the white horizontal stripes with the Fujfilm GFX100S/100 in some images).

It seems proper that if you can afford a PhaseOne system ($$$$), and you do landscape, you really ought to have the Alpa PANO for fast parallax-free panoramas. The rosewood, not so much—cherry or walnut or Ipe or titanium or ballistic plastic would be fine with me. The functionality is right, the finish is not so important to me. But it sure looks nice!

Alpa 12 PANO for PhaseOne IQ4 150
Alpa 12 PANO for PhaseOne IQ4 150

ALPA 12 PANO Rosewood at Capture Integration

The ALPA 12 PANO was introduced in 2018, but unfortunately for those in the US, it has not been available for sale. That is not until now!

The ALPA Alpagon Lenses HR 70, 90 and 138mm offer a large image circle that often cannot be used in its entirety. Which is why the ALPA 12 Pano was built to be the optimal stitching machine. Especially one perfectly designed to take breathtaking panoramas. 

The new ALPA 12 PANO opens up completely new perspectives. Movement of only 10 to 12 millimeters are not enough. That is why the PANO offers a full 35mm of horizontal movement to the left and right with a newly conceived shifting system and fixed dentents for pre-programmed final formats. We will also be keeping the 10mm for further rise and fall simultaneously! 

The advantages of “flat stitching” over simple rotation are manifold. In particular, the time consuming search for nodal points is no longer necessary. The new live view back allows for convenient and straightforward framing which eliminates a lot of the guess work that is often the case with rotational panoramas/.

The camera shares the handgrip with the ALPA 12 MAX and apart from the spirit level module provided, additional elements can be mounted. The camera offers four mounting points in total

...

DIGLLOYD: on the 53.4 X 40.0mm sensor of the PhaseOne IQ4 150, ±35mm both directions yields a total capture area of 53.4 + 35 + 35 = 123mm wide X 40mm high, for a 3-shot capture resolution of 346 megapixels on the 150MP IQ4 150 digital back. Whether the lenses can deliver the goods at such extreme angles and what happens with color shading—dunno.

Louis F writes:

Keep in mind the XT cannot tilt and as such is a non-starter for many Alpa/IQ4150 shooters who use this feature often while shooting landscapes. For hiking the Alpa STC can at least shift around 15mm in both directions and accepts the Alpa tilt adapters of 17 and 34mm when using a SB lens.

DIGLLOYD: noted and accepted. However, in my experience, tilt is vastly overrated as a usable tool in the vast majority of shooting situations, because too much sticks out of the tilted zone of focus and it sticks out like a sore thumb. And f/16, f/22, f/32 produce diffraction dulling so bad I am unwilling to use those apertures.

Roy P writes:

On another note, I checked on the Alpa 12 Pano camera with a couple of people who shoot landscapes with technical cameras + the P1 IQ4 150 back. Their feedback was don’t bother with the Alpa 12 UNLESS your primary goal is pano stitching. Apparently the Alpa 12 is double the bulk and size of a P1 XT, and if pano stitching is an occasional thing and not THE primary goal, then either the XT or a Cambo is much more practical.

DIGLLOYD: makes sense; a camera supporting the movements has to be relative large and heavy and stiff. It would be a lot simpler to carry a short ‘nodal slider” for rotational panoramas. But nothing matches doing a true parallax-free stitched image, so if that’s your thing, I think it would come down to whether the lens performance us satisfactory across the 123mm-wide field, and whether color shading is tolerable, particularly with the 70mm and 90mm lenses.

Alpa 12 PANO for PhaseOne IQ4 150
Alpa 12 PANO for PhaseOne IQ4 150

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Fujifilm GF Lenses: Many are Back in Stock at B&H Photo, including the Fujifilm GF 23mm f/4

re: Fujifilm Medium Format eg Fujifilm GFX100S: What’s Missing in Lenses

The perennial shortage of Fujifilm GF lenses has eased a little, with many lenses in stock as I write this. A few holdouts are still tough to get, but the Fujifilm GF 23mm f/4 and Fujifilm GF 110mm f/2 (two of my favorites!) are back in stock. Update: the 23/4 sold out within a few hours.

CLICK TO VIEW: Lloyd’s Recommended Kit for Fujifilm GFX100S

Needs vary, but click on the list above to see what I recommend for landscape and similar usage.

Below, the full Fujifilm GF system. Click through for current pricing.

Lloyd’s Recommended Kit for Fujifilm GFX100S

Best Deals, Updated Weekly

Fujifilm Quality Control... Decided to Be Picky: Returned the Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR + Reader Comments

Shooting a 100MP camera and getting maybe ~75 megapixels feels like buying one of those cereal boxes which is the same dimensions, but now with 13 oz of product instead of 16 oz.

My field work with the Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR impressed me in certain ways as to the merits of a nice midrange 2X zoom. So convenient, and really a lot of capture there in a package no larger than a Sony A1 and its lenses, smaller and lighter actually!

But the trip also disappointed me in showing me that my loaner test sample was consistently weak on the left side. That’s something I find hard to abide, yet I suspect it is middle of the road and perhaps even one of the better samples. My estimate based on using two dozen or so Fujifilm GF lenses over the past 3-4 years is that at best 1 in 6 samples performs as it ought. That is, without obvious lens skew or similar issues. Which means in 5/6 samples, you never are rewarded with what you potentially could get on the 100MP sensor. And even 50MP sensors show the issue.

So I’ve returned the loaner 35-70mm, having initially intended to buy it.

I want to own the 35-70mm, but not a sample that reminds me that I’m being cheated in image quality. I’m going to take my time and try another sample in June or so. And another and another if I have to. It doesn’t have to be perfect, but I’m not going to accept a lens with an obvious weakness on one side or the other (or top vs bottom).

Roy P writes:

On a different note, I saw your comment on returning the Fuji 35-70. A guy at Phase One explained to me a few years ago that the Schneider blue ring lenses were optically identical to their non-blue ring counterparts, but performed much better on the higher resolution backs (80 MP and greater) solely from much tighter manufacturing tolerances. But it took up the price by some 50% or so.

I think that is the issue with the Fujifilm lenses. Even with the existing lenses, Fujifilm should be able to extract much higher consistency and performance, but at higher prices, probably comparable to the Hasselblad lenses. And any more advanced / better corrected lens designs would also drive up the prices. So the Fujifilm 35-70 is probably built with about the same diligence and manufacturing rigor as a Nikon or Canon kit lens sold through Costco.

Fujifilm’s entire game plan from day one seems to have been to undercut Hasselblad and muscle their way into this segment of the market, so they had to keep the camera and the lenses at a significantly lower price point. Their shock value strategy seems to have worked – the GFX has seriously crippled Hasselblad. But the problem is, of course, in absolute IQ terms, you have these inconsistencies and problems. All the .internal parts are probably cheap and sloppily put together

At this point, I don’t know how serious a player Hasselblad is, so Fujifilm has quite a bit of head room to put out much higher quality lenses at slightly higher prices. Apart from Hasselblad, the nearest competitors for Fujifilm are the Leica S and Phase One systems, both far more expensive than the Fuji at even double the prices. What they have is somewhat in a no man’s land, which is why comparisons with 35mm systems is even a question (e.g., the question you asked, Sony A1 + 24-70 GM II vs. Fuji GFX 100S + 35-70). The differentiation for the Fuji should be much more obvious: higher price for higher quality images.

DIGLLOYD: we cannot really know if Roy’s hypothesis is correct without inside knowledge (other than the physical parts quality thing), but I concur, based on all my experience with GF lenses, including one case which makes we wonder if there is any optical quality control at all at Fujifilm.

To be clear, I am not singling out Fujifilm on lens quality. The same issue exists for all manufacturers, and it is only a question of how loose the quality standards are.

As for optical performance, it is my impression that Fujifilm has, with most of their optical designs, gone for “good enough” performance that falls far short of what Hasselblad XCD lenses can deliver (but see my concerns about the control/management of Hasselblad).

Higher costs from QC are large and real: the reason Zeiss Otus lenses are so expensive is partly because of higher optical element costs, but mainly because of (early on) up to a 50% rejection rate from optical quality control—a massive cost.

CLICK TO VIEW: Fujifilm mid-range lenses

Fresh Snow on White Mountain Forested Hills
f8 @ 1/400 sec electronic shutter, ISO 100; 2022-03-28 15:27:26
Fujifilm GFX100S + Fujifilm GF 35-70mm f/4.5-5.6 WR @ 57.3mm equiv (70mm)
ENV: White Mountains, altitude 7800 ft / 2377 m, 32°F / 0°C
RAW: LACA corrected, vignetting corrected, +20 Whites, +10 Clarity, diffraction mitigating sharpening

[low-res image for bot]

Claude F writes:

Mine is off at 70. The bottom across the frame is tilted or skewed, not sure which but my concession is that I will crop in at that focal length.

DIGLLOYD: we landscape photographers often have to accept some level of inferior lens performance. But we can also try multiple samples. Claude picked the best of three (3) samples!

OWC Thunderblade Thunderbolt SSD

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Apple Mac Studio: Hard to Get Makes it Impossible to Review

Apple Mac Studio, front and rear

Well, I located an Apple Mac Studio top-end except for 64GB memory instead of 128GB.

It lasted all of 5 minutes at B&H—no sooner had I requested it than literally 5 minutes later out of stock it went—and all useful (to me) models are now "end of July" delivery.

Apple Mac Studio Coming for Review... When Supply Chain Delivers

Unless there is a reader getting a new one who can loan it out for 2-3 days, I don’t see how I can review the Apple Mac Studio before August.

...

The supply chain for some things is atrociously bad, and Apple is now suffering major bottlenecks in delivering. Not that the US government has gotten its thumb out of its ass in doing anything useful about it.

Way back in 2017, I wrote:

...years ago I was thinking just how risky it was for Apple to rely so heavily on one country to build its products, particularly the iPhone. That risk has now emerged as not so far fetched...

Apple only doubled-down on its risk in depending on China, and getting in bed with the CCP, and those chickens are coming home to roost. China and the CCP are the next Russia.

Save the sales tax with B&H Payboo. Please and thank you for ordering through B&H with these links. It helps make my reviews possible, such as the recent review of the 2021 Apple MacBook Pro.
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