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Hasselblad X2D: Lacks Sequence Number for Focus Stacking Series

re: please fix this Hasselblad

The Hasselblad X2D lacks a sequence number for files that are port of a focus stacking series.

Nikon makes the same mistake, but Sony and Fujifilm get it right, see below.

Imagine shooting all day, and then having to sort out the focus stacking series (several dozen) from single shots and aperture series. My automated image organization tools can do it all in seconds.

Hasselblad’s sloppy work costs me hours of tedium. A professional tool does not jerk-around its users like this.

This is so easy to fix, but will Hasselblad fix it?

This is not surprising actually: the X2D has numerous usability headaches all stemming from lack of attention to real-world usage. For example, there is no option to reset focus to where it started once the series is captured—a major hassle if focusing was tricky to begin with, and this can make you lose the shot.

What should be provided

In addition to Sequence Number, a Sequence Kind would be useful eg pixel shift, focus bracket, exposure bracket.

Hasselblad

<no sequence number in EXIF>

Sony

Sony provides the following in EXIF:

Sequence Number : 1
Sequence Image Number : 1
Sequence Length : 4 shots
Sequence File Number : 1

Fujifilm

Fujifilm provides the following in EXIF:

Sequence Number : 1
Sequence Image Number : 1
Sequence Length : 12 shots
Sequence File Number : 1

Nikon

<no sequence number in EXIF>

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad Wides

Focus stacking support with Hasselblad X2D

Hasselblad X2D: Adobe Camera Raw White Balance and Tint: Mid-Day Sunlight, SpyderCHECKR

re: white balance and tint

In diglloyd Medium Format:

Hasselblad X2D: Adobe Camera Raw White Balance and Tint: Mid-Day Sunlight, SpyderCHECKR

Get the color right when you process your Hasselblad X2D images in ACR.

See also: White Balance and Tint using Color Checker Card, Screencast + Step-by-Step

CLICK TO VIEW: Color Tools

DataColor SpyderCHECKR
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Hasselblad XCD 45mm f/4P: Optically Swung?

re: lens skew

Unacceptable quality control: a brand new shrink-wrapped Hasselblad XCD 45mm f/4P shows a zone of focus much closer on the right side of the frame than the left. On the order of 40 feet closer when focused 120 feet out. That’s a serious problem and it showed up on the first series I shot—an obvious WTF. All scenes show it.

It could be the camera (much worse issue!), but I cannot cross-test that until more lenses arrive.

With the 3rd rate erratic performance of the Hasselblad XCD 38mm f/2.5 V and the slow-to-sharpen performance of the Hasselblad XCD 55mm f/2.5 V (different camera body, 2 years ago), I’m starting to wonder if Hasselblad quality control has slipped—how could this ever pass QC with even rudimentary checks?

Setting that aside, I’m otherwise quite impressed with the 45/4P. It delivers a very solid imaging performance for only $1099. I hope to compare it to the Hasselblad XCD 45mm f/3.5 soon for more insight.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad Wides

Hasselblad XCD 45mm f/4P

Fujifilm GFX100S II vs Fujifilm GFX100S v1: Value and Pricing, the EVF Question Too

Please use my links to buy, GFX100S II SHIPS June 17:
Buy Fujifilm GFX100S II at B&H Photo...
Fujifilm medium format wishlist...

The Fujifilm GFX100 II is the top of the line with the best EVF etc. Easily the best in the industry, easily. Look through one and you’ll notice right away. I own one.

The new sibling “S” model, the Fujifilm GFX100S II lists at $5000, a full $1000 less than what the Fujifilm GFX100S v1 started at. An improved feature set and $1000 less is a trend I’d love to see from other brands!

IMO, the EVF is the single most important feature on these cameras, given that they all have the same core feature set.

The Fujifilm GFX100S v1 is still selling new for $4399, see below. Surely a price drop of $400 or more has to come soon, because a $600 difference in the context of total cost of a medium format system (camera + lenses) amounts to less than the sales tax. For context, Leica sells a mediocre low-res M11 EVF for $740!

With the 9.44MP 1.0X EVF of the $7500 Fujifilm GFX100 II, the experience through it is the best in the industry, and I can nail manual focus every time with it. Versus a frustrating and error-prone hunt with the GFX100S.

It remains to be seen how the 5.4MP EVF of the GFX100S II fares—quite good but it’s going to fall short IMO, since Nikon Z8, Leica SL3, etc have EVFs in the 3.76 to 5.76MP range—a difference I notice immediately vs my Sony A7R V 9.44MP EVF.

CLICK TO VIEW: Memory Cards for Fujifilm GFX100S II, 100 II

Image review is a positive feedback loop — or a negative one

Try as I might, I *cannot* enjoy the camera as much with the pixellated and dull EVF in the GFX100S v1—captures just look blah—I have to use my imagination and experience. I’ve disliked that crappy experience all these years, being reminded of how sucky it is every time I picked up my Sony.

No one would buy an iPhone with a shitty display, so why buy a camera with one?

Whether the GFX100S II EVF makes the cut I cannot yet say—probably and for most.

Am I arguing for the GFX100 II vs the GFX100S II? Of course. But the price difference is steep and only you can judge for yourself on the value of that EVF and the other diffs. And that difference would buy you the fabulous Fujifilm GF 55mm f/1.7.

Fujifilm GFX100S II

Fujifilm GFX100S II: Reader Comments

Please use my links to buy, GFX100S II SHIPS June 17:
Buy Fujifilm GFX100S II at B&H Photo...
Fujifilm medium format wishlist...

The new GFX100S II has seemingly landed with all the excitement of a soft ball of clay rolling off a table. Maybe things will pick up, because it’s a very fine camera.

CLICK TO VIEW: Fujifilm Medium Format Basic Kit

Fujifilm GFX100S II

Glenn K writes:

The GFX 100S II is an attractive camera at an attractive price... but before I sink $10K+ into the GFX system, I need to see Fujifilm update some of their original lenses.

In Sony E-mount we have Sony, Tamron and now Sigma releasing second generations of bread-and-butter lenses. Canon and Nikon's oldest mirrorless lenses are more recent, but some of the original GFX lenses are long-in-tooth and less than stellar performers. The 32-64 and 100-200 would be a prime candidates for a refresh. I wonder if Fujifilm would allow Sigma to produce lenses for the GFX mount?

DIGLLOYD: yep.

With a potential Fujifilm GFX180 in the pipeline, the need for higher performance lenses becomes extreme. By this I mean these three factors are critical to sharp finished images:

  • High sharpness across the field wide open
  • Negligible focus shift and minimal field curvature — if you can’t get it into focus reliably and predictably it ain’t gonna be sharp.
  • Low distortion — correcting distortion robs sharpness.

CLICK TO VIEW: Fujifilm Medium Format Top Picks

Sigma is thinking on it; see Sigma’s CEO Wants to Make Lenses for Medium Format Cameras eg Fujifilm GFX100 II. But I have doubts that Sigma would hit the mark. They might go for 'big fast heavy lenses (why?) or a Sigma 'Contemporary' line that is cheaper but compromised. What I want is slower super-sharp lenses with no focus shift and minimal field curvature—like the Fujifilm GF 55mm f/1.7, the gem of the line.

CLICK TO VIEW: Memory Cards for Fujifilm GFX100S II, 100 II

The only non-telephoto prime lens that has fully satisfied me is the Fujifilm GF 55mm f/1.7—it’s the gem of the lineup and shows what is possible. But I did NOT need the f/1.7 aperture. Make it smaller and better and f/2.8 and that would have been fantastic. The 30/3.5 is a turd, the 45/2.8 and 63/2.8 are 6 year old tech, the 55/3.5 is nice enough for what it is but the 55/1.8 is better, the 80/1.7 has way too much field curvature and not sharp enough in outer zones, the 23/4 can be good but try finding a good sample, etc.

The 45-100 and 32-64 zooms are quite good for what they are, but super frustrating for landscape use because the focus shift and field curvature make them a squirrel orgy in practical usage—fine for weddings and stuff like that but for landscape of form of self flagellation. Don’t get me started on the steaming dog turd 100-200mm.

The 20-35 f/4 is solid but I’m having trouble finding a sample as good as the one I first tested. It’s almost as if Fujifilm ships only extra-good samples to start, lets the reputation build, then drops the quality control metrics. Pure speculation.


Fujifilm GF 500mm f/5.6 R LM OIS WR Announced

Fujifilm GF 500mm f/5.6 R LM OIS WR

I could have used the 500/5.6 last summer for a golden eagle up in the White Mountains. But what I really needed was a 2000mm.

About $3499 FUJIFILM FUJINON GF 500mm f/5.6 R LM OIS WR...

The challenge with such lenses, as with the Fujifilm GF 250mm f/4, is that they are big and heavy enough that carrying one is impractical unless there is an explicit goal in mind—most other lenses can be part of a kit of varying capabilities. But with 250mm and 500mm, they are just too bulky to fit into that plan, and they displace other lenses.

  • f/5.6 to f/32
  • 396mm (Full-Frame Equivalent) [diglloyd 411mm]
  • Fast Super-Telephoto Lens
  • Linear Autofocus Motor
  • 2 Super ED Elements. 5 ED Elements
  • Rounded 9-Blade Diaphragm
  • 6-Stop Image Stabilization
  • Minimum Focusing Distance: 9'
  • Filter Thread: 95mm
  • Weather-Resistant Construction
  • Dovetail built into tripod foot.

I’m glad to see the offering, but what’s the target audience? It makes so much more sense to shoot sports or wildlife with 35mmm-format cameras.

CLICK TO VIEW: Fujifilm Medium Format Top Picks

Of course there are uses, but not many spontaneous ones. Maybe on a super-clear cold winter morning distant shots might be slick. Otherwise, the atmospheric distortion is problematic, and it has to be for shorter range.

I’ll work the GF 500/5.6 into my review schedule this year. Among other things, it might be incredibly hard to use well if any kind of conditions involving wind.

Fujifilm GF 500mm f/5.6 R LM OIS WR

The longest lens yet for GFX cameras, this super-telephoto prime balances impressive reach with a relatively lightweight and portable design. Fast autofocus, robust image stabilization, and a weather-resistant design round out this new telephoto lens that will be a mainstay for photographing sports and wildlife subjects—a unique feat for medium format.

  • Equivalent to a 396mm Lens on Full Frame
    [diglloyd incorrect, it is 411mm via the long edge of frame]
  • Fast Linear AF Motor with Focus Presets
  • Measures 9.4” Long, Weighs 3 lb
  • 6-Stop-Effective Optical IS
  • Weather-Resistant Design
  • Compatible with GF 1.4X TC WR Teleconverter

Super-Telephoto for Medium Format

Uniquely long for medium format, this lens enables photographing sports, wildlife, and other distant subjects with the larger sensor size for truly distinct image quality and subject-background separation. The f/5.6 maximum aperture suits working in available lighting while a 6-stop-effective image stabilization system suits handheld use. Well-matched to the GFX 100S II, this lens sports a refined optical design, lightweight profile, and linear autofocus motor that all contribute to nimble and responsive performance.

Optical design Fujifilm GF 500mm f/5.6 R LM OIS WR

Impressively Portable and Durable

Despite packing a nearly 400mm-equivalent focal length, this super-telephoto lens measures just over 9” long and weighs 3 lb, making it an ideal travel companion or suitable for daily use. The sleek form factor opens up its use cases, too, allowing for a creative option for landscape, fashion, and street photography. Also, its weather-resistant design can handle adverse conditions with ease.

TC Compatibility for Even Greater Reach

When paired with the optional GF 1.4X TC WR Teleconverter, this lens becomes an effective 700mm f/8 prime, which translates to a 554mm-equivalent focal length, all while maintaining autofocus and image stabilization. Also, the TC has a matched weather-resistant design for confident use outdoors.

Specifications

As per Fujifilm.

Fujifilm GF 500mm f/5.6 R LM OIS WR
Focal length: 500mm
equivalent to 411mm in 35mm format
Aperture range: f/5.6 - f/32
Optical design: 21 elements in 14 groups
1 Super ED element and 2 extra-low dispersion
Iris blades: 9, rounded
Focusing range: 9.1 ft = 2.8 m
Magnification: 0.2X = 1:5
Angle of view: 6.3°
Filter thread: 95mm
Weight, nominal: 3 lb = 1375 g
Dimensions: 4.1 x 9.7 in = 104.5 x 246.5 mm
Includes: FUJIFILM FLCP-95 95mm Lens Cap
FUJIFILM RLCP-002 Rear Lens Cap
Lens Hood
Tripod Collar Foot
Lens Pouch Limited
1-Year Manufacturer Warranty
Price about $3499

Below, note the tripod-ready dovetail built into the tripod foot. Smart! But not so smart is the same stupid teeter-totter design of the tripod foot, quite literally engineered for maximum instability. Take a look at a properly engineered lens like the Leica R 280mm f/4 APO-Telyt-R or Nikon 50-300 and you’ instantly see what I mean.

Fujifilm GF 500mm f/5.6 R LM OIS WR

Still Unobtanium: Leica 35mm f/2 APO-Summicron-M ASPH

Save yourself $7300 and get the equally good Voigtlander VM 35mm f/2 APO-Lanthar Aspherical.

CLICK TO VIEW: 35mm Lenses for Leica M

Apparently Leica cannot produce this lens.

3 years later...

Leica 35mm f/2 APO-Summicron-M ASPH
Leica 35mm f/2 APO-Summicron-M ASPH

 

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Memory Cards for Fujifilm GFX100S II and Fujifilm GFX100 II

Please use my links to buy, GFX100S II SHIPS June 17:
Buy Fujifilm GFX100S II at B&H Photo...
Fujifilm medium format wishlist...

I use OWC Atlas Ultra and OWC Atlas Pro memory cards exclusively.

The OWC SDXC and CFExpress cards have performed flawlessly for ~2 years now in every camera I have used them in (Fujifilm, Leica, Sony, Nikon, Canon, Hasselblad)—perfect track record. They are robustly constucted, and they can be restored to factory fresh condition using OWC Innergize.

Fujifilm GFX100 II

Memory cards for Fujifilm GFX100S II

The top-line Fujifilm GFX100 II has CFExpress type B + SDXC slots—see below.

But the “S” cameras eg Fujifilm GFX100S II and Fujifilm GFX100S and Fujifilm GFX100 all have dual SDXC card slots. Use dual slots in various ways:

  • Dual matching cards, writing everything to both cards.
  • One primary card and one overflow card
  • One primary card for RAW and one for JPG.
  • Single card, daily downloads.

For most shooters, a good strategy is to use one ultra high performance OWC Atlas Ultra SDXC card (256GB is ample for most shooters, 128GB for many) along with an OWC Atlas Pro SDXC card of larger capacity eg 1TB. Plenty of space, and everything is going to the highest performance card most of the time.

Because I travel for up to 6 weeks at a time, I work a little differently. That is, I want to retain my shoots on the card until my return never erasing the card. That requires larger capacity cards.

Why and How You Should Be Using Both of Your Camera's Memory Card Slots.

Fujifilm GFX100 II

Memory cards for Fujifilm GFX100 II

The Fujifilm GFX100 II has one CFExpress Type B slot, and one SDXC slot.

My primary card is a 1TB OWC Atlas Ultra CFExpress Type B card and the other slot uses a 1TB OWC Atlas Pro SDXC card.

Downloads from the Type B card are up to 10X faster, so if I do a big shoot, I just love that after hiking 10 hours and not yet having had dinner at 8PM when a 10-15 minute delay means that much less sleep.

The CFExpress Type B cards fit in my wallet, making an ultra high speed encrypted wallet backup, another use besides capturing images in a camera. And for the pro that must not ever lose stuff, a 2TB card used as a backup for a multi-week shoot is a godsend—can go just about anywhere so even if gear is stolen your work can be retained with a little foresight.


Fujifilm GFX100S II vs Fujifilm GFX100 II: the Key Differences that Matters (to me)

Fujifilm GFX100S II

re: Fujifilm GFX100 II

re: Fujifilm GFX100S II Coming Soon? Features?

I own the Fujifilm GFX100 II now for a few weeks. Price aside, I’d much rather have its industry-best EVF—nothing else matters as much.

Please use my links to buy, SHIPS June 17:
Buy Fujifilm GFX100S II at B&H Photo...
SDXC and CFExpress Type B
Fujifilm medium format wishlist...

CLICK TO VIEW: Fujifilm Medium Format Top Picks

Key differences for Fujifilm GFX100S II vs Fujifilm GFX100 II:

Some of these are negatives, but some might be positives eg size and weight:

  • $5000 vs $7500
  • EVF 5.76 megadot @ 0.84X vs 9.44 megadot @ 1.0X magnification.
  • ~12mm smaller in two dimensions.
  • 197g lighter (883g vs 1030g)
  • Lacks CFExpress Type B slot (dual SDXC)
  • Lacks the 3 FN buttons.
  • Slower frame rate roughly 4 vs 5.
  • Much smaller burst buffer.
  • Anything else?

GFX100 II a tough sell for most

Few users will realize $2500 great value in the GFX100 II vs GFX100S II.

Because I do precise work in which focusing and image evaluation are critical, the EVF difference is a big deal—it matters when focusing and when evaluating images. Using it is a joy on the GFX100 II. The GFX100S II EVF will still be nice, and far nicer than the GFX100S/GFX100. But when your eyes are older and/or tired, then the superfine resolution at 1.0X magnification is something you see right away. And you can use directly for pinpoint manual focus when needed, not to mention the pleasure of the high-res image review. All you have to do is compare something like the Nikon Z8 or Leica SL3 EVF against the GFX100 II EVF and no further persuasion is necessary—night and day. Therefore, I assign a value of $1200 to the top-grade EVF all by itself. For me and my work.

Recommended storage

The CFExpress Type B slot is not a big deal, but more than once I have appreciated the 10X faster download using the OWC Atlas CFexpress Card Reader. After hiking all day, downloading in 30 seconds or less versus 5-10 minutes is pretty nice.

The size and weight are somewhat ambiguous: smaller/lighter is obviously better for all-around use, but not necessarily better with the larger lenses when actually using the camera.

The three Fn butons are useful but I don't really need more than one of them.

The frame rate and burst buffer are rarely of importance... maybe on a very large focus stack. I don’t ever use CL or CH shooting modes so it’s of no practical value other than focus stacking.

Does the GFXS100 II have the redesigned micro lenses of the GFX100 II? While I did not prove it, I thought that at wider apertures the GFX100 II was yielding better image detail in the outer zones than the GFX100S, based on some comparisons I shot.

Fujifilm GFX100S II, top view

 

Fujifilm GFX100S II

NEW: Fujifilm GFX100S II Matches Most but Not All Features of Fujifilm GFX100 II

Fujifilm GFX100S II

re: Fujifilm GFX100 II

re: Fujifilm GFX100S II Coming Soon? Features?

Looks great! Solid improvements at a $1000 lower price ($5000) than the original GFX100S ($6000 when introduced). I call that an improvement!

In a nutshell: a slightly smaller and 197g lighter version of the GFX100 II. Lacks the 3 FN buttons, less nice EVF, no CFExpress slot, slower frame rate, much smaller burst buffer. More below.

Buy Fujifilm GFX100S II at B&H Photo...
(please use my link to buy) SHIPS June 17

CLICK TO VIEW: Fujifilm Medium Format Top Picks

Overview

This second-generation compact GFX Series medium-format mirrorless camera from Fujifilm features a new 102MP sensor, improved high-resolution EVF, AI-driven autofocus and intelligent subject detection, and more robust IBIS—all in a body that’s comparable in size to a full-frame camera.

An improved X-Processor 5 offers greater speed, performance, and image quality. The fast processing enables continuous shooting up to 7 fps, 4K video recording at rates up to 720 Mbps, more precise AF, and in-camera image processing for working with Pixel-Shift Multi-Shot, Film Simulation modes, and more, making this one of Fujifilm's most impressive releases yet..

  • New 102MP CMOS II 44 x 33mm Sensor
  • AI-Driven AF with Improved Subject Tracking & Detection
  • Upgraded 5.76m-dot EVF with 0.84x Magnification
  • Up to 8-Stop IBIS + Pixel-Shift Multi-Shot Mode
  • 16-Bit Raw Recording and ISO 80 Sensitivity
  • 4K30p Video at 4:2:2 10-Bit, ProRes & Blackmagic RAW
  • Native Frame.io Camera to Cloud Functionality
  • Compact, Lightweight Body Design
  • Dual UHS-II SD memory card slots
Fujifilm GFX100S II, top view

Storage slots

Lacks high-speed CFExpress slot.

Fujifilm GFX100S II: dual slots: UHS-II SDXC
Fujifilm GFX100  II: dual slots: FExpress Type B + SDXC

Fujifilm GFX100S II
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Hasselblad XCD 55mm f/2.5 V Aperture Series: Butte near San Rafael Swell (X2D)

Hasselblad XCD 38mm f/2.5 V

re: Hasselblad XCD 55mm f/2.5 V

This aperture series from f/2.5 to f/11 shows that that highly variable shapness across the field of the Hasselblad XCD 55mm f/2.5 V is not due to its forward focus shift, but rather to sub-mediocre performance that makes the lens problematic at less than f/9.

Hasselblad XCD 55mm f/2.5 V Aperture Series: Butte near San Rafael Swell

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/4 to f/11, plus crops.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad Wides

Butte near San Rafael Swell
Butte near San Rafael Swell
f2.5 @ 1/340 sec electronic shutter, ISO 64; 2022-10-30 16:08:58
Hasselblad X2D 100C + Hasselblad XCD 55mm f/2.5 V @ 45.3mm equiv (55mm)
ENV: San Rafael Swell, altitude 5440 ft / 1658 m, 70°F / 21°C
RAW: Adobe Color, Enhance Details, LACA corrected, vignetting corrected, WB 4600°K tint -2, push 0.4 stops, +10 Whites, saturation -15, +10 Clarity, AI Denoise 10, +10 Vibrance

[low-res image for bot]

Hasselblad XCD 55mm f/2.5 V Aperture Series: Interstate 70 Transects San Rafael Swell (X2D)

Hasselblad XCD 38mm f/2.5 V

re: Hasselblad XCD 55mm f/2.5 V

This aperture series from f/2.5 to f/9 confirms the findings in Butte near San Rafael Swell but with a far distance scene which leaves little open to interpretation.

Hasselblad XCD 55mm f/2.5 V Aperture Series: Interstate 70 Transects San Rafael Swell

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/2.5 to f/9, plus crops.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad Wides

 

 

 

If driving east, stop at the Spotted Wolf View Area for this magnificent view. If driving West, the opposite pullout does not have this view but does have interesting stuff. It’s so nifty that it’s worth switching directions and seeing both. It will cost you 10 miles or so.

Interstate 70 Transects San Rafael Swell
Interstate 70 Transects San Rafael Swell
f6.3 @ 1/80 sec electronic shutter, ISO 64; 2022-10-30 15:02:29
Hasselblad X2D 100C + Hasselblad XCD 55mm f/2.5 V @ 45.3mm equiv (55mm)
ENV: San Rafael Swell, Spotted Wolf, altitude 5330 ft / 1625 m, 75°F / 23°C
RAW: Adobe Landscape, Enhance Details, LACA corrected, vignetting corrected, WB 4800°K tint 4, push 0.66 stops, +40 Shadows, +10 Whites, saturation -10, +20 Dehaze, AI Denoise 10

[low-res image for bot]

Hasselblad XCD 38mm f/2.5 V Aperture Series: Butte near San Rafael Swell (X2D)

Hasselblad XCD 38mm f/2.5 V

re: Hasselblad XCD 38mm f/2.5 V

This page evaluates the Hasselblad XCD 38mm f/2.5 from f/2.5 to f/11, with attention to its pronounced central rearward focus shift, along with its erratically uneven performance that makes it a terrible choice for landscape photography.

Or was it just a “bad sample” fresh out of the box? And if so, how could this make it past quality control?

Hasselblad XCD 38mm f/2.5 V Aperture Series: Butte near San Rafael Swell

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/2.5 to f/11, plus crops.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad Wides

Butte near San Rafael Swell
Butte near San Rafael Swell
f2.5 @ 1/1500 sec electronic shutter, ISO 64; 2022-10-30 16:11:37
Hasselblad X2D 100C + Hasselblad XCD 38mm f/2.5 V @ 31.3mm equiv (38mm)
ENV: San Rafael Swell, altitude 5340 ft / 1628 m, 70°F / 21°C
RAW: Enhance Details, LACA corrected, WB 4800°K tint 4, push 0.66 stops, +10 Whites, +10 Clarity, AI Denoise 10, +10 Vibrance

[low-res image for bot]
OWC Envoy Pro Elektron

Ultra-high performance across entire capacity, outperforms the competition.

Tiny, bus-powered, rugged, compact!


√ No more slow and noisy hard drives!

Hasselblad XCD 38mm f/2.5: Non-Performer Worst Lens of the Lineup?

Hasselblad XCD 38mm f/2.5 V

re: Hasselblad XCD 38mm f/2.5 Awful Focus Shift: Lens Should Not Have Made it Into Production

Hasselblad: send me a lens to re-evaluate, I’ll happily give it a 2nd look.

With today’s high-res image sensors, you cannot mess around with the wrong lens if your goals have anything to do with sharpness.

Last night I was searching through aperture series that I had shot in October 2022 with the Hasselblad XCD 38mm f/2.5 V.

I could not find even one sharp image at any aperture.

I looked closer and confirmed what looks to be the worst focus shift I have ever seen in a lens, in which f/6.3 is much worse than f/2.5. In every series—obvious (OMG!) in some, less obvious in others due to subject matter, but always there.

But it’s not just that; it’s just poor overall, since even with focus shift, a crisp zone of focus has to show up at some distance or another, and I checked for that rigorously... severely disappointing results.

Its faults are so obvious on the 110 PPI NEC PA302W here at home. That fall, I was traveling and had only my iMac 5K whose pixel density made it challenging to evaluate sharpness.

Was the lens just bad? If so, how did it every make it through rudimentary quality control?

I don’t like showing crappy lenses, and I’d rather assume “bad sample”, but given that two working pros wrote me about focus shift problems with the lens (returned it), I have to think this may be normal, at least the focus shift part. But the abysmal performance could be a bad sample.

Accordingly, I will soon show a few aperture series detailing the (lack of) performance.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad Wides

Wooden Boardwalk, Dusk
f11 @ 144.0 sec electronic shutter, ISO 64; 2022-10-20 18:42:44
Hasselblad X2D 100C + Hasselblad XCD 38mm f/2.5 V @ 31.3mm equiv (38mm)
ENV: Colorado, altitude 8460 ft / 2579 m, 56°F / 13°C
RAW: LACA corrected, pull 0.3 stops, +30 Whites, +10 Clarity, diffraction mitigating sharpening

[low-res image for bot]

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The OWC 650GB Atlas Ultra CFexpress Type B Memory Card is an outstanding performer (what I use) for Leica SL3 or Canon EOS R5 or Nikon Z8 or Hasselblad X2D or Fujifilm GFX100 II—works flawlessly in all.

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Canon EOS R1 “Currently in Development”

A 12-second video.

You can buy one in ____ months|years.

How large is the sports-shooter market anyway?

The meta message is more interesting: “we feel the pressure to pre-announce a camera”.

Canon EOS R1
Canon EOS R1

Canon Develops EOS R1 As First Flagship Model for EOS R System

New Image Processing System Further Improves AF and Image Quality

MELVILLE, N.Y., May 15, 2024 - Canon U.S.A., Inc. today announced that its parent company, Canon Inc. announced today that it is currently developing the EOS R1, a full-frame mirrorless camera, as the first flagship model for the EOS R SYSTEM equipped with an RF mount and is aiming for a 2024 release.

The EOS R1 is a mirrorless camera geared toward professionals that brings together Canon's cutting-edge technology and combines top-class performance with the strong durability and high reliability sought in a flagship model. This camera will dramatically improve1 the performance of both still images and video and meet the high requirements of professionals on the frontlines of a wide range of fields including sports, news reporting, and video production.

This camera employs the newly developed image processor DIGIC Accelerator in addition to the pre-existing processor DIGIC X. The new image processing system, composed of these processors and a new CMOS sensor, enables large volumes of data to be processed at high speeds and delivers never-before-seen advancements in Auto Focus (AF) and other functions.

By combining the new image processing system and deep learning technology to an advanced degree, Canon has achieved high-speed and high-accuracy subject recognition. For example, subject tracking accuracy has been improved so that in team sporting events where multiple subjects intersect, the target subject can continually be tracked even if another player passes directly in front of them. In addition, the AF "Action Priority" function recognizes subject movement by rapidly analyzing the subject's status. In moments during a sports game when it is difficult to predict what will happen next, this function automatically determines the player performing a certain action, such as shooting a ball, as the main subject and instantly shifts the AF frame, thereby helping to capture decisive moments of gameplay.

The combination of the new image processing system and deep learning technology will help to improve image quality. Canon implements the image noise reduction function, which has been previously developed and improved as part of the software for PCs, as a camera function to further improve image quality and contribute to user creativity.

Canon is working on field tests for this camera and will support capturing definitive and impactful moments at international sporting events to be held in the future.

Going forward, Canon will continue to expand the EOS R SYSTEM lineup of fascinating cameras and RF lenses, thereby continuing to meet the demands of a wide range of users and contribute to the development of photography and video culture.

DIGLLOYD: will the camera for non-definitive and non-impactful images also?

Someone was working overtime to develop that brilliantly informative last paragraph.

CLICK TO VIEW: Canon Mirrorless


Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 Aperture Series: Flag Shed (X2D)

Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4

re: Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4
re: Discontinued Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4?

This page presents evaluates the Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 from f/4 to f/8 on a planar target in order to demonstrate the sharpness across the field, as well as focus shift and field curvature.

For anyone buying 100MP camera with lenses costing up to $5K or so, presumably at least one goal is eking out every bit of sharpness. Even at 21mm excellent shot discipline is required to get your money’s worth.

Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 Aperture Series: Flag Shed (X2D)

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/4 to f/11, plus crops.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad Wides

f8 @ 1/300 sec electronic shutter, ISO 64; 2022-10-21 08:42:48
Hasselblad X2D 100C + Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 @ 18mm equiv (21mm)
ENV: Colorado, altitude 8400 ft / 2560 m, 55°F / 12°C
RAW: Camera Standard, Enhance Details, LACA corrected, vignetting corrected, WB 5000°K tint 4, push 0.66 stops, +10 Clarity, AI Denoise 10, +10 Vibrance

[low-res image for bot]
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Reader Comment: Hasselblad Color

Hasselblad X2D 100 C

re: Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4
re: Discontinued Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4?

Reader David K writes in reference to Examples: Colorado in October:

Such beautiful color in your Hasselblad photos, Lloyd! I’ve always heard that Hasselblad had the best colors right off the bat. Could you please comment about this.

Keep up the good “honest” work. It is greatly appreciated.

DIGLLOYD: since RAW files are just numbers (no color exists!), so color rendition equates to how the RAW file conversion is done. The gross aspects of that are the camera profile, which establishes the color and contrast and all sorts of things having to do with look and feel.

In the case of most of the examples, I actually used the Adobe Color camera profile, which is not Camera Standard eg what the “Hasselblad color” look would be. I used Adobe Color because I liked the rendition better than what the camera matching result would be. Not every image though.

Also, many of the images needed careful tweaks for contrast control, see below.

In other words, the profile is what determines the overall rendition. If you dig that, I strongly suggesting reviewing all my workflow screencasts.

Adobe Camera Raw: Changing Image Look & Feel Using Camera Profile
Fujifilm GFX100S: Camera Profiles in Adobe Camera Raw
Reader Question: Picture Profile for RAW + JPEG
Reader Question: Camera Profile in Adobe Camera Raw
camera profile and post processing

That said, I believe that Hasselblad takes considerable care in tuning the total image quality numbers coming off the sensor, both with quality of electronics as well as the whole analog to digital imaging pipeline. Hasselblad also takes particular care to protect highlights and trends to underexposure to accomplish that (as well as somehow tuning things for ISO 64 when Fujifilm is using ISO100 with the same sensor). Is this better than the Fujifilm GFX100 II with its tweaked ISO 80 sensor from the GFX100S? Too soon to say, but I say that Hasselblad X2D color and image quality are superior to the Fujifilm GFX100S. But I also say that the GFX100S image quality is inferior to the Fujifilm GFX100 II.

Specific example: I have not yet detected the white stripes issue with the Hasselblad X2D, which makes sense in the context of great attention to the imaging pipeline by Hasselbld. It could be there and I’ve just not detected it yet.

Reader Fazal M writes:

I know you’ve collaborated with Ming Thein before, you might have noticed this comment of his:
https://blog.mingthein.com/2018/01/31/long-term-review-the-hasselblad-x1d/

“All in all, this means that image quality is a known quantity: it matches that of the H5D-50c and H6D-50c, which is to say – short of the 54x40mm 100MP sensor, is about the best you can get today. Like all Hasselblad cameras, sensors used in the X1D are individually profiled to a fixed reference color standard at all ISOs – I shoot the X1D comfortably to ISO 12,800. In fact, each camera has nearly half a gigabyte of calibration data in it. I believe Hasselblad is the only company to do this – it’s one of the reasons output is so spectrally neutral and tonally natural across the sensitivity range, and no dark frame subtraction is required even on exposures up to one hour. Color accuracy is one of the main reasons I switched; those of you who have Workflow III will see that the Hasselblad profiles have almost no adjustments, and by far the least HSL adjustments of any camera included. Individual sensor calibration also means consistency is excellent – my H5D-50c, H6D-100c, CFV-50c and X1D all produce identical tonal response (with the exception of course of the H6D-100c, which has a bit more dynamic range extension at either end)” — Ming Thein

DIGLLOYD: this is what I was alluding to in the comments above, though I had forgotten about this info from Ming, who worked with Hasselbad very closely for a time. All that attention to detail could mean “better” color. But it is better color or just a total higher image quality? Maybe the two cannot be separated. And maybe there is something to it.

OTOH, the camera profile still exerts the main influence, which is why for many of the examples I used Adobe Color. But I also notice quite different white balance and tint betweenthat and Camera Standard. Furthermore, the Fujifilm profiles rock for some situations, making much better clouds with ASTIA for example. These are lacking for the X2D. Which is “better”? I can see arguments both ways. At any rate, the Hasselblad image quality is superb. I just don’t know that it is better than the Fujifilm GFX100 II at this point.

I do not know of a methodology to prove it, given the huge influence of color profiles. Even using the same profile (Adobe Color) does not necessarily prove anything, because it may be sub-optimal for the X2D. I think it comes down to shooting thousands of images and getting a feel for it. I have full confidence in the X2D image quality as superb.I will say that the X2D delivers more pleasing results than the GFX100S. But I also say that the GFX100 II is noticeably better than the GFX100S.

There is also the issue of using Hasselblad Phocus (I am unwilling to do so) versus Adobe Camera Raw.

The Hasselblad X2D might be the best among conventional medium format (PhaseOne IQ4 as good or better), but I do not yet have a sense of the Fujifilm GFX100 II, having had no opportunity to shoot the two concurrently.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad Wides

f9 @ 2.5 sec electronic shutter, ISO 64; 2022-10-18 18:44:37
Hasselblad X2D 100C + Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 @ 18mm equiv (21mm)
ENV: Colorado, altitude 8400 ft / 2560 m, 58°F / 14°C
RAW: Adobe Color, Enhance Details, LACA corrected, vignetting corrected, WB 5000°K tint 4, push 1 stops, +100 Shadows, +10 Whites, +20 Contrast, +10 Clarity, AI Denoise 10, diffraction mitigating sharpening

[low-res image for bot]

The image above could not just be processed trivially, I had to push it, boost the shadows, correct vignetting, etc. The raw conversion adjustments mods are shown in the caption with every image I publish, though I sometimes forget to add a few to the image metadata info.

As shown below, the image above was an ideal ETTR exposure with a very dark hugely underexposed foreground.

RawDigger info and histogram
RawDigger info and histogram

Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 Aperture Series: Cabin at Dusk (X2D)

Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4

re: Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4
re: Discontinued Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4?

What a shame that Hasselblad has discontinued the XCD 21/4—nothing else out there like it for medium format. A real gem. I’ve queried Hasselbad twice now on the “why”, but so far no answer.

...

This page presents evaluates the Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 from f/4 to f/11 on a near-far scene.

It is especially instructive in showing how field curvature affects sharpness across the frame, and why careful focus placement matters to total sharpness.

Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 Aperture Series: Whiteout Morning (X2D)

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/4 to f/11, plus crops.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad Wides

f6.3 @ 0.5 sec electronic shutter, ISO 64; 2022-10-18 18:32:58
Hasselblad X2D 100C + Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 @ 18mm equiv (21mm)
ENV: Colorado, altitude 8400 ft / 2560 m, 55°F / 12°C
RAW: Adobe Color, Enhance Details, LACA corrected, WB 5000°K tint 4, push 0.83 stops, +10 Whites, +10 Clarity, AI Denoise 10, +10 Vibrance

[low-res image for bot]

Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 Examples: Distortion and Distortion Correction

Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4

re: Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4
re: Discontinued Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4?

Regarding MTF, Hasselblad states:

Our calculations are conducted without factoring in distortion correction, which typically has a negligible effect on MTF. While distortion correction in Phocus is available, it's not mandatory.

Ummm... not so true.

I’ve published the distortion graph along with a distortion correction example vs no correction example for the Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4.

Distortion Correction for Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4

Includes example at full camera resolution plus crops corrected vs uncorrected.

Cabin, Eastern Side
f9 @ 40.0 sec electronic shutter, ISO 64; 2022-10-18 18:45:44
Hasselblad X2D 100C + Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 @ 18mm equiv (21mm)
ENV: Colorado, altitude 8400 ft / 2560 m, 58°F / 14°C
RAW: Enhance Details, LACA corrected, vignetting corrected, AI Denoise 10

[low-res image for bot]
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Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 Examples: Colorado in October

Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4

re: Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4
re: Discontinued Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4?

These various examples were in Colorado in October 2022. This page discusses optical behaviors when warranted but otherwise is about how the images look overall.

The sweeping angle of view is unlike any other lens in the XCD line. So very nice for the outdoors.

Having achieved this optical feat, Hasselblad has dropped this gem from its lens lineup.

Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 Examples: Colorado in October

All examples all presented at up to full camera resolution. Best appreciated on a 6K display.

More examples to be added today...

Towering Aspen at Sunset
f9 @ 2.5 sec electronic shutter, ISO 64; 2022-10-18 18:44:37
Hasselblad X2D 100C + Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 @ 18mm equiv (21mm)
ENV: Colorado, altitude 8400 ft / 2560 m, 58°F / 14°C
RAW: Adobe Color, Enhance Details, LACA corrected, vignetting corrected, WB 5000°K tint 4, push 1 stops, +100 Shadows, +10 Whites, +20 Contrast, +10 Clarity, AI Denoise 10, diffraction mitigating sharpening

[low-res image for bot]
Mule Deer Doe Drinking
f9 @ 0.5 sec handheld electronic shutter, ISO 64; 2022-10-18 18:19:49
Hasselblad X2D 100C + Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 @ 18mm equiv (21mm)
ENV: Colorado, altitude 8400 ft / 2560 m, 58°F / 14°C
RAW: LACA corrected, WB 5200°K tint 4, push 0.85 stops, +100 Shadows, -100 Highlights, +10 Whites, +10 Dehaze, +10 Clarity, diffraction mitigating sharpening, +10 Vibrance

[low-res image for bot]
Leafless White Aspen amid Grasses
f11 @ 1/75 sec electronic shutter, ISO 64; 2022-10-18 16:18:00
Hasselblad X2D 100C + Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 @ 18mm equiv (21mm)
ENV: Colorado, altitude 8400 ft / 2560 m, 68°F / 20°C
RAW: Adobe Color, Enhance Details, LACA corrected, vignetting corrected, push 0.4 stops, +10 Whites, +10 Clarity, AI Denoise 10, diffraction mitigating sharpening, +10 Vibrance

[low-res image for bot]
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Hasselblad MTF Charts: Calculated, Not Measured, Distortion Correction not Accounted-For

Hasselblad XCD 25mm f/2.5 V

re: fantasy MTF

I posed two questions to my Hasselblad press contact 2024-05-09.

Hasselblad response, 2024-05-13

Thanks again for your questions. Below are our answers. 

  1. DIGLLOYD: does Hasselblad calculate or measure for MTF?  No statement is made, I presume it is calculated from a model.

The published data are calculated in the datasheet- attached to this email.

  1. DIGLLOYD: do the  MTF charts take into account distortion correction that is mandatory in Phocus.

Our calculations are conducted without factoring in distortion correction, which typically has a negligible effect on MTF. While distortion correction in Phocus is available, it's not mandatory.

Additionally, the published curves do not incorporate the Phocus correction for lateral color. However, it's worth noting that this correction usually yields a positive impact on MTF.

Thank you, Hasselblad Press

Calculated not measured

AFAIK, the only company that actually measures MTF for publication is Zeiss. The Zeiss K8 MTF tester was demonstrated to me in Oberkochen by the late Hubert Nasse, who coined the term fantasy MTF to describe the shenanigans (my word) used by companies to make performance claims.

Hasselblad seems to have high levels of quality control, but when selling $$$$$ lenses whose performance claims are not actually verified by testing real lenses... that leaves me disappointed.

Computer models for behavior (virtually any kind) range from wish-goals to little more than propaganda, as recent years demonstrate. We would like to hope that the lenses we buy deliver tp the MTF chart claims, but my experience over 15 years of testing hundreds of lenses from virtually every vendor tell me otherwise. They rarely describe real lens performance. The most recent example I can point to here is my quest to find a Fujifilm GF 20-35mm f/4 as good as the one I first tested.

That different samples of the same lens can perform quite different makes a mockery of MTF charts of any kind, unless the vendor explicitly guarantees at least as good a performance as the published charts. The Zeiss Otus lenses were held to that standard. Some were better, but none were worse, or at least that was what I was told.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad Wides

Toggle to compare f/2.5 to f/5.6. See detailed commentary in my review.

Hasselblad XCD 25mm f/2.5 V: calculated (not measured) MTF including diffraction MTF

Distortion Correction

I am glad to hear that Hasselblad Phocus does not mandate the correction.

I take huge issue with the claim above that distortion correction “typically has a negligible effect on MTF”. This is emphatically false, as I have shown with every vendor’s lenses repeatedly in numerous articles with A/B comparisons. Namely the areas in which maximum stretching is required are guaranteed to lose resolving power, by simple math if nothing else. And this is readily visible in a loss of brilliance and detai.

Lateral color

I agree that correcting lateral chromatic aberration improves MTF when the model of it maps exactly to the lens actual behavior for the specific lens in use. However, I regularly see cases where a lens is 'off' in which case the correction can improve things on one side of the frame while creating LaCA on the other side, and thereby reduce MTF. A lens whose LaCA is nil is always a superior choice, because real lenses always deviate significantly from computer model designs.


Sunset in the Aspen Forest

Just for fun.

f9 @ 0.3 sec handheld electronic shutter, ISO 64; 2022-10-18 18:01:03
Hasselblad X2D 100C + Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 @ 18mm equiv (21mm)
ENV: Colorado, altitude 8400 ft / 2560 m, 60°F / 15°C
RAW: LACA corrected, vignetting corrected, AI Denoise 10

[low-res image for bot]

The Lost Art of Fixing Electronic Things

Things are too complicated to fix any more.

Generally speaking, repairing many types of electronics is not cost effective; they’re made to function until they don’t in today’s throw-away society.

Anthony Kouttron of salvagedcircuitry.com writes about his ultra-nerd experience of diagnosing and repairing a Sigma 45mm f/2.8 lens.

Sigma 45mm f/2.8 Lens Repair

Check out his other repair projects—pretty cool stuff.

Repairing a Sigma 45mm f/2.8 lens

Nikon GOOF: the Missing Nikon D850E — but it’s not too late

JUST SAY NO
Nikon FTZ Mount Adapter

re: Zeiss ZF.2 and Zeiss ZE DSLR Lenses: are they Just Useless now? Why no D850E(VF)

re: please fix this Nikon

The Nikon D850 was the best DSLR ever created, in image quality and haptics.

Retweet and share my post on X and maybe we can get Nikon’s attention.

The obvious evolution was not the Nikon Z7 along with the Nikon FTZ Mount Adapter. Necessary perhaps, but a foolish move by itself, as the market itself proves today with Nikon trailing Sony by a wide margin in market share.

The market even today would welcome a Nikon D850 sporting an EVF instead of an optical viewfinder—the Nikon D850E. Nikon F-mount.

Instead, Nikon enamored itself of the Nikon Z7 and forced the use of a lens adapter, immediately rendering tens of millions of Nikon F-Mount lenses a PITA to use, and at extra cost and awkwardness. What an shortsighted way to terminate the most widely accepted lens mount ever created.

CLICK TO VIEW: Zeiss Lenses for DSLR

Meanwhile, Nikon produces all these “retro” models like the Nikon Zf and several predecessors. Good luck with that strategy.

What about the 20 million (50 million?) Nikon F-mount lenses out there, not to mention all my wonderful Zeiss Milvus and Zeiss Otus glass, which now sells hugely discounted due to no good platform*?

Nikon could use a boost. The R&D is mostly already done. Just remove that optical viewfinder and put in a 9-megapixel 1.0X viewfinder and I bet the Nikon D850E would outsell the Nikon Z8.

* The Nikon D850 remains a fine camera, one of the finest ever designed and its image quality is still highly-competitive. But the hassle of using a loupe on the rear LCD is very high compared to today’s superb EVF designs.

Nikon D850

Michael Erlewine on Hasselblad X2D: “Getting Where I want to Go: Moving from Nikon to Hasselblad”

An essay that Michael Erlewine posted over on NikonGear.com.

Getting Where I want to Go: Moving from Nikon to Hasselblad

I’m talking here about where I want to go with photography. I’m getting my new Hasselblad medium format camera system tuned to where I can produce what I want to see, what I see through my eyes and in the moment. And also capturing the vibe I feel in that moment. It’s real.

Hasselblad X2D

Perhaps it’s a little thing to blog about, but to me it is somewhat of a big deal because it is a steppingstone from where I can go from here. I have locked it in, meaning I have made it real, actual, and existent in this world we all live in. I can count on this technique being just what it is and that it is repeatable.

How many weeks did it take me to accomplish this? Many and with the help and guidance from a friendly (and brilliant) photographer, Lloyd Chambers who pointed out to me (patiently) what I needed to know, even when I brushed the comments off and didn’t pick up on them right away.

I usually get around to what is pointed out to me sooner or later. I feel like one of those street venders trying to walk while covered with hanging pots and pans on my coat, banging away. I want to divest all that and take up on the good stuff, but it takes me a while to get my boat pointed in the right direction. I usually get there after a while.

You will think that a switch from my familiar Nikon system to the Hasselblad X2D would be a walk in the park, but that’s hardly so. It’s more than just a new camera, but a whole other take on the world of photography, at least for me.

However, with the Hasselblad X2D with its 100-pixel sensor, I find that I am forced beyond my comfort level, which has been closeup photography, and plunged into landscape photography with little warning.

I’ve never been that interested in shooting landscapes, yet the X2D has kind of forced me awake to landscape considerations because everything I look at with this medium-format camera is worth taking a picture of. No need to scout around for subject matter. Just about everything admits of beauty if photographed properly.

So, I am stuck in that boat… and loving it. You know I have read and watched everything about the Hasselblad X2D on the Internet, and studied each lens, whether I have it or not, in detail. And when all is said and done, and I’ve done it, the work of Lloyd Chambers stands out as precious. To my knowledge, from what I’ve found no one has done the detailed study and workup of modern cameras better than Chambers.

I know, much of that work is stuck behind a paywall, yet considering all the books I try to read and so on, it’s worth every penny to me to get the guidance and advice that Chambers compiles. It’s like a grand encyclopedia of photography and with this new Hasselblad system I have had to take myself to the woodshed and learn.

And I don’t always take Chambers advice in the multitude of articles he has arrayed, yet sooner or later I find myself coming around to understanding the value of what he is pointing out in great detail. He has done the homework.

So, despite my predilection for closeup, I find myself becoming a landscape photographer and learning it. And it is not easy, but very subtle what is required for the landscape view.

I not only like what I’m learning about landscape work, but I’m loving it and becoming a convert. I’m already converted, yet just have to learn how to do it properly.

Here is a photo I took yesterday of the ferns coming up in our back yard. It’s an early attempt but I find it very satisfying of an inner itch that I have for context and clarity.

This is the Hasselblad X2D with the XCD 21mm f/4 lens, two frames, but I could have done it with a single frame I believe.

DIGLLOYD: I’m trying to work with Hasselblad to get more help in covering the X2D and lenses, but they’ve pretty much told me to go pound sand. I had a contact there that was working well several years ago, but that person left. The new press person has never heard of me and seems to be uninterested to the point of boredeom.

See also videos by Lloyd.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad Wides

f11 @ 1/19 sec handheld electronic shutter, ISO 64; 2022-10-23 11:22:29
Hasselblad X2D 100C + Hasselblad XCD 55mm f/2.5 V @ 45.3mm equiv (55mm)
ENV: Colorado, altitude 8400 ft / 2560 m, 28°F / -2°C
RAW: Enhance Details, LACA corrected, WB 6000°K tint 4, +10 Whites, +10 Clarity, AI Denoise 10, diffraction mitigating sharpening, +10 Vibrance

[low-res image for bot]
f12 @ 1/30 sec handheld electronic shutter, ISO 64; 2022-10-23 11:39:01
Hasselblad X2D 100C + Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 @ 18mm equiv (21mm)
ENV: Colorado, altitude 8400 ft / 2560 m, 28°F / -2°C
RAW: LACA corrected, vignetting corrected, WB 6000°K tint 0, +24 Shadows, +10 Whites, +10 Clarity, diffraction mitigating sharpening, +10 Vibrance

[low-res image for bot]

Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 Aperture Series: Whiteout Morning (X2D)

Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4

The MTF chart for the just-announced Hasselblad XCD 25mm f/2.5 V looking like a dead-ringer for MTF of the Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 (discontinued, why?) so I thought I would revisit the 21/4 for its performance.

...

This page presents evaluates the Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 from f/4 to f/11 on a near-far scene.

Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 Aperture Series: Whiteout Morning (X2D)

Includes images up to full camera resolution from f/4 to f/11, plus crops.

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad Wides

f6.3 @ 1/115 sec electronic shutter, ISO 64; 2022-10-23 11:30:12
Hasselblad X2D 100C + Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 @ 18mm equiv (21mm)
ENV: Colorado, altitude 8400 ft / 2560 m, 28°F / -2°C
RAW: Camera Standard, Enhance Details, LACA corrected, vignetting corrected, WB 6000°K tint 0, +10 Whites, +10 Clarity, AI Denoise 10, +10 Vibrance

[low-res image for bot]

Hasselblad XCD 25mm f/2.5 V: Review Soon... well maybe

Hasselblad XCD 25mm f/2.5 V

About $3600 Hasselblad XCD 25mm f/2.5 V...

UPDATE: my contact at B&H was not available today, so the lens went out of stock. Timeline now... no idea. But with some luck I will get both the 25/2.5 and the 28/4P.
...

The just-announced Hasselblad XCD 25mm f/2.5 V is in stock already (not any more), and assuming it stays that way through tomorrow and B&H Photo gets it to me, I’ll be reviewing it pronto.

Similarly, I hope to review the Hasselblad XCD 28mm f/4 P, which has not yet shown up at B&H Photo. With a little luck I can cover both, as well as the Hasselblad XCD 45mm f/4 P versus the Hasselblad XCD 45mm f/3.5.

Also, I never reviewed the Hasselblad XCD 65mm f/2.8 on the 100-megapixel sensor so now seems like a good time to revisit it. And maybe another focal length or two.

The Hasselblad XCD 90mm f/2.5 V does not want to seem to come into stock, and it’s darned expensive too, but if it shows up I’ll see if I can incorporate it.

I’m also interested in seeing how well the Hasselblad X2D focus bracketing support for focus stacking support works—better than Fujifilm’s broken implementation I hope. That feature was not available when I reviewed the X2D back in autumn of 2022. And the camera had problems of various kinds... time has passed and hopefully most of the issues have been fixed.

Only a Trickle: Fujifilm GF 30mm f/5.6 TS and Fujifilm GF 110mm f/5.6 TS

Fujifilm GF 110mm f/5.6 TS

re: tilt/shift

re: Fujifilm GF 30mm f/5.6 TS: What would Tilt do for this Scene and Others Like It?
re: Parallax-Free Shift-Lens Stitching for 168 megapixel Images on Fujilm GFX 100 II, GFX100S, etc
re: Fujifilm Locks Down Medium Format Market with Fujifilm GFX100 II, Fujifilm GF 30/5.6 TS, Fujifilm GF 110/5.6 TS

I did some checking today, and found that only a tiny trickle of the Fujifilm GF 30mm f/5.6 TS and Fujifilm GF 110mm f/5.6 TS are coming in each month at B&H Photo.

It is much better to review them together, but I might have to do one at a time. Getting even one of them is tough, the 30mm being as rare as hen’s teeth, so if you want either/both, grab one anywhere you can find it.

Maybe if I can do only one at a time I will do so when June hits, but I hold out some hope for both, and hitting the Eastern Sierra around that time.

It seems odd for Fujifilm to deliver these lenses so slowly. Last fall they were delayed, and then production has been at a slow trickle for 6 months.

Maybe there is some kind of production problem or quality control issue?

As I understand it, the Fujifilm GFX100 II sensor has been optimized to perform better than the Fujifilm GFX100S and others, via a new microlens design that is more friendly to a steeper ray angle that occurs with such lenses. Something like that.

CLICK TO VIEW: Fujifilm GFX System Top Picks

Fujifilm GF 30mm f/5.6 TS

Hasselblad Introduces the Hasselblad XCD 25mm f/2.5 V, “a Wide Angle Lens for Night Photography”

Hasselblad XCD 25mm f/2.5 V

re: Hasselblad MTF Charts: Calculated, Not Measured, No Accounting for Distortion Correction

Hasselblad discontinued the superb Hasselblad XCD 21mm f/4 for unstated reasons. The new 25/2.5 V is apparently its substitute, but not nearly as wide.

About $3600 Hasselblad XCD 25mm f/2.5 V...

CLICK TO VIEW: Hasselblad XCD System

While lovely overall, the Hasselblad XCD 38mm f/2.5 V and Hasselblad XCD 55mm f/2.5 both have very troubling practical usability issues that can rob scenes of sharpness without special efforts being made. As documented in my review pages for both.

Will the new 25mm f/2.5 V avoid focus shift issues? Doubtful.

Will the new 25mm f/2.5 V offer minimal field curvature? It had better, if it is for night photography. The MTF charts suggests a quite strong field curvature.

The MTF charts suggests that optical performance is already nearly optimal wide open at f/2.5 but that field curvature is the main degrader of sharpness (at the same distance).

When using Phocus, you may lose noticeable sharpness and micro contrast due to distortion correction of the warpage of ~2.5% distortion. For that reason, I’d not want to use Phocus for landscape photography—and it’s an absurdity to have no choice at all: “When images are imported to Phocus, distortion is automatically removed”.

Hasselblad Introduces the Hasselblad XCD 25mm f/2.5 V, a Wide Angle Lens for Night Photography

2024-05-07

The XCD 2,5/25V is the widest-angle lens in the Hasselblad XCD Versatile (V) series lenses. It has a 20mm full-frame equivalent focal length and a maximum aperture of f/2,5. With its expansive view and large aperture, the XCD 2,5/25V was designed for turning nocturnal cityscapes, starry skies, and indoor portraits into extraordinary captures.

Its wide-angle focal length encompasses a wealth of scenic elements, providing photographers with ample space and composition. The f/2,5 large aperture, coupled with its excellent optical performance, ensures rich highlights and shadows are captured within every frame, even at dusk or after dark.

The XCD 2,5/25V features an optical structure of thirteen elements in ten groups, including four aspherical elements and three ED elements, meeting the high-resolution requirements of 100-megapixel sensors. This ensures images are sharp and crisp from the centre to the edges while effectively suppressing chromatic dispersion. The optical quality of the lens is also showcased by its robust close-up capabilities. With a 25cm minimum focusing distance and 1:5:8 magnification, its large aperture accentuates close ups, enhancing the expressiveness of subjects like gourmet dishes and flowers.

As part of the Hasselblad XCD V lens series, the design of the XCD 2,5/25V is known for integrating user-friendly functionality with elegance, in both its aesthetics and control. Enhancing the elegance is an engraved “V" insignia on the lens, with the "H" logo engraved on both the focus and control rings.

With a gentle push- pull of the focus ring, photographers can quickly switch between AF and MF modes. ‌In MF mode, intuitive scale marks on the lens keep focus distance and depth of field at a clear glance, enabling precise focus control. Functions such as aperture, shutter speed, ISO, and exposure compensation can be customised on the control ring, serving as an extension of the camera, allowing users to capture the perfect moment with ease.

The XCD 2,5/25V is equipped with a linear stepping motor and a smaller, lighter focusing lens group, providing a quick and responsive focusing experience when paired with Hasselblad X or V system cameras that support PDAF.

The lens adopts a large-diameter leaf shutter module with a shutter speed of up to 1/4000s. This enables both global shutter and flash synchronisation at all speeds. The XCD 2,5/25V lens is priced at $3,699 USD / 4,199 EUR and is available to purchase online and at selected retail stores worldwide. For more information about the XCD 2,5/25V, visit www.hasselblad.com.

When Can We Expect a Fujifilm GFX180 and Fujifilm GFX250?

Fujifilm GFX180 concept

re: Fujifilm GFX100 II, Fujifilm GFX100S: Standout Lenses that Nail It
re: Attention all Camera Makers: 23.5 Things To Please Your Customers
re: please fix this Fujifilm

re: 100 Megapixels coming to a Sony A7R VI ?
re: Sony’s New 19200 X 12800 = 247-Megapixel Sensor IMX811-AAQR Implies 108 Megapixels for 35mm Format
re: Where Does Fujifilm Go From Here with the GFX System?

Fujifilm GFX 180 megapixel when?

The technology is already in production—Sony has 2.81 micron sensor technology up to 19240 X 12840.

In the 43.8 X 32.9mm format of the Fujifilm medium format, that pixel pitch implies resolution at around 15600 X 12064 = ~188 megapixels. Call it a GFX180 or GFX190 either way.

CLICK TO VIEW: Fujifilm GFX System Top Picks

250 megapixel 3:2 monster?

Even more exciting IMO, Fujiilm could also produce a 247 megapixel 19240 X 12840 camera with 54 X 36mm 19240 X 12840 sensor having a 3:2 aspect ratio.

The two existing tilt/shift lenses (30mm and 110mm) can easily cover that area, having been designed to cover 68mm width (44mm + 12mm + 12mm) eg 14mm of image circle coverage to spare making tilt still totally viable and useful.

Can the GF mount accommodate the wider angle of view needed for a 54mm-wide sensor? Probably, but it’s not a certainty.

The tilt/shift lenses can already produce 157 megapixel parallax-free images* on the Fujifilm GFX100 II using 3-frame stitches with horizontal shift. But that’s a far cry from a single shot 247MP capture.

* Using technique in which the front of the lens does not move, using a counter-shift if necessary.

Sony’s latest sensor technology goes as large as 54 X 36mm with 2.81 micron pixels.

Sony IMX811-AAQR specifications


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