Latest or all posts or last 15, 30, 90 or 180 days.
Memory Upgrades for 2019 Mac Pro - Save Up to 65% vs Factory Costs
Handpicked deals...
$50 $25
SAVE $25

$7 $7
SAVE $0

$1480 $1230
SAVE $250

$3999 $2499
SAVE $1500

$1498 $1098
SAVE $400

$2897 $1797
SAVE $1100

$399 $349
SAVE $50

$899 $699
SAVE $200

$3297 $1897
SAVE $1400

$749 $499
SAVE $250

$799 $567
SAVE $232

$870 $749
SAVE $121

$3499 $2199
SAVE $1300

$3599 $2299
SAVE $1300

$4499 $2650
SAVE $1849

$748 $598
SAVE $150

$899 $699
SAVE $200

$799 $729
SAVE $70

$3599 $2299
SAVE $1300

$3499 $2199
SAVE $1300

$4499 $2650
SAVE $1849

$1997 $897
SAVE $1100

$3099 $2499
SAVE $600

$2799 $2199
SAVE $600

$4999 $4599
SAVE $400

$4499 $2650
SAVE $1849

New Mac Pro?

Or iMac 5K or iMac Pro?
Consult with Lloyd ASAP before buying!


System configuration for CPU, GPU, memory, SSD, backup, RAID, optimizing performance, workflow.
For YOUR optimal workflow

Avoid costly mistakes in throwing money at the problem for less performance and/or buying the wrong machine for your own needs!

Remote screen sharing available for RAID, software configuration, etc.

More about 2019 Mac Pro vs iMac 5K vs iMac Pro...

Downsampling and Binning

Kim P writes:

When speaking about the D800, the possibility of downsampling from 36MP is often mentioned to improve quality. I wonder whether there is any special way of downsampling or if the “resize” in e.g. Capture NX2 or Photoshop is doing a proper job.

Also the possibility of binning has been mentioned in relation to the D800, e.g. combining 4 pixels to one. Could binning just be made in postprocessing and is it different from “downsampling”. So in short my question is:

Is “binning” = “downsampling” = “resizing”?

Thanks for your good work on all the details. I have been a long time subscriber of DAP, Making Sharp Images and Zeiss Guide.

By the way, I have the ZF’s 25/2.8, 50/2, and 100/2, so I image to be well equipped for the D800, which I already pre-ordered.

DIGLLOYD: Downsampling and resizing are synonymous. When I use those terms, I mean resizing the image in Photoshop or a similar program and/or converting from RAW to a size that is smaller than the native resolution. I expect that the process is pretty similar either way, but that would depend on the particular RAW converter. I have not studied the relative results from downsampling during RAW vs downsampling in Photoshop, and even there Photoshop has several variants.

The term“binning” usually refers to taking more than one photosite and combining it with others (dumping them into the same “bin” so to speak) at the sensor/electronics level, producing a file in the camera of some lower resolution. The process is certainly more complex than just a simple addition, due to the Bayer pattern on most sensors. And in theory, a camera might be smarter about making the best use of its data via binning, especially if it has a powerful CPU to use some extra smarts. In practice, one might be much better off with all the resolution intact, and then being able to selectively address any noise in any troublesome areas (since high-key areas are likely to have little issue with noise). Unless one really wants smaller files to begin with.

Saddlebag Lake
Zeiss 100mm f/2 Makro-Planar
Save Big $$$$ on Memory for 2019 Mac Pro

Up to 65% better pricing than Apple

Lloyd recommends 32GB RDIMM modules for most users (more expensive LRDIMMS are for 512GB or more).



Save the tax, we pay you back, instantly!
View all handpicked deals...

Pelican ProGear 1810 LED Keychain Light (Blue)
$7 $7
SAVE $0

diglloyd Inc. | FTC Disclosure | PRIVACY POLICY | Trademarks | Terms of Use
Contact | About Lloyd Chambers | Consulting | Photo Tours
RSS Feeds | Twitter
Copyright © 2019 diglloyd Inc, all rights reserved.