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Hasselblad XCD 30mm f/3.5 Evaluation at MOD (Minimum Object Distance)

Hasselblad XCD 30mm f/3.5

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list.

The about $3995 Hasselblad XCD 30mm f/3.5 is equivalent to a 25.4mm f/2.87 as compared to a 35mm full frame camera (long dimension of frame). It is thus a solid wide angle choice—not super wide and not moderate, just right for many purposes.

The Hasselblad XCD 30mm f/3.5 for the Hasselblad X1D looks to be a very fine performer, but with a key behavior that every X1D shooter should be aware of.

This series at MOD (minimum object distance) assesses overall sharpness along with focus shift and secondary color aberrations.

In my review of the Hasselblad X system in diglloyd Medium Format:

Hasselblad XCD 30mm f/3.5 Aperture Series at MOD: Dolls, Focus Shift

Includes images up to full resolution as well as large crops, all from f/3.5 - f/11.

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On the Road

I’ll be working on the Hasselblad XCD 30mm f/3.5 starting Tuesday.

Southern California, Camino Real double century (completed), looking at universities with daughter—Dad’s job.

Cal Poly Pomona has a very content Muscovy Duck, at least until some brat kid harrassed it back into the water (parents smiling approvingly).

Muscovy Duck
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Hasselblad XCD 30mm f/3.5 Coming Soon

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list.

I will have the about $3995 Hasselblad XCD 30mm f/3.5 for testing on the Hasselblad X1D on Tuesday Feb 21, to be reviewed in the Medium Format section. This should give me just enough time to review it and do some more Hasselblad X1D work before the Fujifilm GFX system arrives.

The about $3995 Hasselblad XCD 30mm f/3.5 is equivalent to a 25.4mm f/2.87 as compared to a 35mm full frame camera (long dimension of frame). It is thus a solid wide angle choice—not super wide and not moderate, just right for many purposes.

Hasselblad XCD 30mm f/3.5

Reader Comment: Making Images Optimally With Confidence and Consistency

Cal T writes:

I just finished the first of your series at Zeiss Lenspire. Well done! I am looking forward to the rest of the series. I also went to, I think, all of the links to your other writings. I knew (still know) so little about how lenses actually work. I do appreciate your advice on Zeiss primes. They are a joy to use and, on those occasions when I get it right, I get amazing images.

Maybe via the education I’m getting from my subscription with you I’ll be able to actually figure out how to regularly get these results and not just be surprised when they somehow happen. ;-)

DIGLLOYD: the best “cheat sheet” I have is Making Sharp Images. It’s not as “sexy” as I’d like, but it is chock full of what it took my years to learn. I consider it my most imporant publication of all for anyone looking to get the best results, no matter what camera is used.

All my other publications include related useful information, but MSI is best read through in its entirety. Understood an applied, it should true “years” into “months” in terms of achieving peak results consistently.

New Article on Zeiss Lenspire Site: “Zoom or Prime Lens? A series by Lloyd Chambers”

I’ve published a number of articles over the past year on the Zeiss Lenspire site.

Published yesterday is Zoom or Prime Lens? A series by Lloyd Chambers.

Other articles at lenspire.zeiss.com:

These articles are also available here on this site, with higher quality image presentation.

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Hasselblad Updates X1D Firmware to 1.15.0

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list.

The Hasselblad X1D firmware update is now online. I have successfully upgraded the firmware but not yet tested the improvements.

Compared to v1.14.2:

Hasselblad X1D
  • Focus peaking
  • GPS support
  • Max/min settings for AutoISO
  • HC Lens Adapter support (Manual Focus only)
  • Video poster frame
  • Selectable 50/100% zoom level in manual focus assist
  • Display menu: Separate Exposure Simulation On/Off setting for M and for A/S/P/Full Auto
  • About menu: "Usage" shows shutter count for lens
  • Custom Modes - Show actual exposure mode on Control Screen
  • Improved contrast level in video
  • Improved auto white balance
  • Improved support for Phocus Mobile
  • LCD color improvements
  • Language updates
  • Bug fixes
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Hasselblad X1D + XCD 90mm f/3.2 Aperture Series: View to Tower at Dusk

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list.

Hasselblad X1D

This near-to-far subject places a premium on lens performance in terms of real depth of field in mixed lighting from blue dusk to bluish white to the garish illumination on the nearby tower. The color combination seemed to be just perfect at dusk, such a nice balance.

In my review of the Hasselblad XCD 90mm f/3.2 in the Medium Format section:

Hasselblad X1D + 90mm f/3.2 Aperture Series: View to Tower at Dusk

Includes images from f/3.2 to f/12 up to full resolution, with crops.

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Sigma sd Quattro H Color Rendition: Richly Saturated Reds

Sigma sd Quattro-H

See my Sigma mirrorless wish list.

I take a look at the Sigma sd Quattro H on intensely saturated reds, the same subject shot with the Hasselblad X1D and Nikon D810 a few days ago.

Sigma sd Quattro H Color Rendition: Richly Saturated Reds

Image at sizes up to full 25.5 megapixel resolution, with RawDigger histogram and Sigma Photo Pro settings.

There is only one acceptable Color Mode in Sigma Photo Pro for this shot.

Viewing this image on a display with less than the full AdobeRGB color gamut will not reveal the ideas discussed above—the reds will be flattened. Use a wide gamut display.

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Fujifilm GFX: Coming In Two Weeks (I Hope)

See my Fujifilm GFX wish list and Hasselblad X1D wish list.

My coverage of the Hasselblad X1D system will continue: the 30mm f/3.5 should be coming fairly soon, and I’m hoping to get more outdoors shots with it by early March.

With expected availability of March 1, the Fujifilm GFX system ought to arrive March 2nd; I should get one of the first few to arrive. I expect to be doing an in-depth look at the Fujifilm GFX system, particularly since more lenses are coming over the first three available for pre-order now.

This medium format work with the X1D and soon the GFX is very interesting. Finally there is very serious competition for the high end of the DSLR market and competition that makes Leica irrelevant for landscape shooters.

Hasselblad XCD 90mm f/3.2: Unusual Bokeh for Out-of-Focus Blurs

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list.

Hasselblad X1D

The Hasselblad XCD 90mm f/3.2 is unusual in its bokeh behaviors, particularly wide open

In my review of the Hasselblad XCD 90mm f/3.2 in the Medium Format section:

Hasselblad XCD 90mm f/3.2 Bokeh: Out-of-Focus Lights at Night

Includes images from f/3.2 to f/9 with partial stops to see the effects.

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Hasselblad X1D + XCD 90mm f/3.2 Aperture Series: Colorful Bicycle

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list.

Hasselblad X1D

This colorful bike with its fine details, high contrast black and white, popping colors and rusted chain caught my eye. Crummy lighting, but the Hasselblad X1D + HCD 90/3.2 deliver a very fine image.

In my review of the Hasselblad XCD 90mm f/3.2 in the Medium Format section:

Hasselblad X1D + 90mm f/3.2 Aperture Series: Colorful Bicycle

Includes images from f/3.2 to f/12 with crops.

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Hasselblad X1D + XCD 45mm f/3.2 Aperture Series: Mosaic Detail

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list.

This night scene is partly about lens performance, and partly about sensor performance. Night photography demands a lot from a camera (total sensor and imaging chain). In particular, its ability to make clean detail in dark areas is very important during raw conversion or post processing.

Hasselblad X1D

These images required aggressive contrast control for shadows and highlights, something possible only with a very high quality raw image.

In my review of the Hasselblad XCD 45mm f/3.5 in the Medium Format section:

Hasselblad X1D + 45mm f/3.5 Aperture Series: Night Scene

Includes images from f/3.2 to f/16 at up to full resolution with crops.

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Hasselblad X1D + XCD 45mm f/3.5 Aperture Series: Mosaic Detail

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list.

This far-distance subject is one of the most demanding of any I know, because it is planar (flat) and with very fine detail. Any lens deviation such as symmetry or field curvature pops out instantly as a flaw. This is about as tough a real-world imaging challenge as there is.

Hasselblad X1D

This series from f/3.5 through f/16 demonstrates the imaging power of the Hasselblad XCD 45mm f/3.5 at far distance.

In my review of the Hasselblad XCD 45mm f/3.5 in the Medium Format section:

Hasselblad X1D + 45mm f/3.5 Aperture Series: Mosaic

Includes images from f/3.2 to f/16 at up to full resolution.

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Hasselblad X1D + XCD 90mm f/3.2 Aperture Series: Mosaic Detail

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list.

This far-distance subject is one of the most demanding of any I know, because it is planar (flat) and with very fine detail. Any lens deviation such as symmetry or field curvature pops out instantly as a flaw. This is about as tough a real-world imaging challenge as there is.

Hasselblad X1D

This series from f/3.2 through f/16 demonstrates the awesome imaging power of the Hasselblad XCD 90mm f/3.2 at far distance.

In my review of the Hasselblad XCD 90mm f/3.2 in the Medium Format section:

Hasselblad X1D + 90mm f/3.2 Aperture Series: Mosaic

Includes images from f/3.2 to f/16 at up to full resolution.

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Year of the Great Camera Company Shakeout?

Yesterday I wrote Is This the Year of Cool New Cameras?.

But might it also be the Year of the Great Camera Company Shakeout? If not the end for some, the beginning of the end, unless course is altered and some hard choices made.

Leica

Leica is a ship without a keel, drifting randomly through a sea of faster/better/cheaper offerings, and now facing two medium format systems that cost the same or less than the M and SL systems. See Is Leica a Credible Player?.

The M system abandoned with only token updates. The SL system too little, too late, too expensive, way off-mission for any M shooter, unexecuted. The S system abandoned, with angry users (some suing Leica for quality problems, others just quietly seething). The T system a pathetic toy. Leica should go back to its roots by refocusing all its resources solely in making the M system great again. The Leica Q falls into that “root” category—successful and true to mission.

Nikon

Due to years of doing absolutely nothing to counter the camera phone threat on the low end and the Sony threat at the bread-and-butter level, Nikon seems to be in trouble, issuing a Notice of Recognition of Extraordinary Loss today. The new Nikon DL was also canceled. Clearly the company is now under stress.

The write-downs are from the lithography business (not cameras). At least with Zeiss, that business is far more important than consumer lenses. I wonder if this might be at least partly true for the total Nikon corporate entity, an what it portends for the future of Nikon professional cameras.

Emphasis added.

This is to announce the recognition of extraordinary loss for the nine months ended December 31, 2016 (from April 1 to December 31, 2016), as below.

Recognition of Restructuring Expenses

As announced in “Notice of Restructuring” released on November 8, 2016, Nikon Group is currently under a fundamental company-wide restructuring to improve its corporate value as shifting from a strategy pursuing revenue growth to one pursuing profit enhancement.

In accordance with this restructuring, the Group recorded extraordinary loss of 29,790 million yen, mainly incurred from inventory write-downs/write-off in Semiconductor Lithography Business, as restructuring expenses for the nine months ended December 31, 2016.

Also, restructuring expenses in Imaging Products Business and the expenses related to “Results of Solicitation for Voluntary Retirement,” which is released today, are expected to incur in the fourth quarter of this fiscal year.

As a result, the total amount of restructuring expenses for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2017 will be approximately 53,000 million yen, which is 5,000 million yen increase from the previous estimate of approximately 48,000 million yen in “Notice of Restructuring” released on November 8, 2016.

Pentax

Great technology in the Ricoh GR and Pentax 645Z, with these products having seen no development. A terrific camera (Pentax K1 in SuperRes pixel shift mode) with zero lenses I’d want to use on it. And now, the announcement of a new APS-C DSLR. How long can this go on? Do it right, or get out of the game. I visited Pentax at CES but could find no one I could converse with (in English) who knew anything about products. Still, I have not seen any signs of stress announced for Pentax yet.

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Is This the Year of Cool New Cameras?

Every vendor ought to be releasing someting nifty this year. Maybe not all, but I can’t see how these vendors can stay in the game without at least announcing some major advance this year.

See my various wish lists at B&H Photo.

Sony

First off, if you’ve wanted a Sony A7R II, you can get $800 off plus the value of a trade-in: $300 instant rebate + $480 trade-in savings + the value of the trade-in camera. Other models have similar deals. See the trade-in deal page.

Which leads to this idea: why would such a large savings be offered unless something new is in the works from Sony, maybe several new cameras.

Might Sony introduce a medium format system later this year? With Fujifilm in the game, and Sony already having a low-to-high product range, it seems probable to me.

Hasselblad X system

My review of the Hasselblad X system is in full swing in Medium Format.

Fujifilm medium format

I expect to have a Fujifilm GFX as part of the first arrival batch on March 1st or thereabouts. The review will join the Hasselblad X system review in Medium Format.

Nikon D810 replacement?

The Nikon D810 is now down to about $2796 (USA warranty version), much lower on ebay if you are willing to take on the risk of gray market repair issues (I’m not recommending that). Production has reportedly ceased, begging the question of what comes next: a Nikon D820 or D900 with a higher-res sensor with equivalent per-pixel quality? Dare we hope for at least one optional high-res EVF or an F-mount mirrorless camera, possibly with a slightly larger than 35mm sensor?

Are Nikon and Canon going to ignore the serious risk of the high-end migrating to the Fujifilm GFX system and thus eviscerating an avid group of D810 users? Or perhaps are they, particularly Nikon, just going to fade away and die?

Canon

Canon ought to be due for some kind of high-end DSLR, if only to improve sensor quality over the Canon 5Ds R.

Pentax and Ricoh

Seems to me its time for Pentax to take the excellent Pentax 645Z system and make a mirrorless camera. And for Ricoh to make a full-frame Ricoh GR.

Leica

Leica seems to be a dead end. A dead S-system. An abandonded M system. An overpriced SL system with lenses that don’t ship. Only a small market for platypus scrotum M cameras. Game over there unless someone capable of strategic thinking takes the helm. Exception: the Leica Q is true to mission as is the new M10 (even though it disappoints me in resolution and EVF). More of that, and Leica can get back on track.

Panasonic and Olympus

The Panasonic GH5 sets a new bar for 4K video. The Olympus E-M1 II is the best-ever still-shooter M4/3 camera.

And... Apple

The iMac 5K is overdue for a refresh. I’d sure like to see an iMac 8K 32-inch model. The Mac Pro is long overdue for a refresh. Ditto for the MacBook and MacBook Air and MacMini.

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Hasselblad X1D + XCD 45/3.2 SHOOTOUT vs Nikon D810 + Zeiss 35/1.4: Flowers with 4-stop Underexposure + Push

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list and Nikon wish list.

Gross underexposure is obviously not the goal of any photographer except that a high dynamic range image by definition results in gross underexposure of dark areas. It is these areas that suffer the most and are thus the most limiting to image quality.

Hasselblad X1D

The prior comparison at base ISO looked at the best possible results with the best possible ETTR exposure. But what about gross underexposure? Which is the case in the dark shadow areas any time one shoots a high dynamic range scene.

Now added to my review of the Hasselblad X1D system in the Medium Format section:

Hasselblad X1D Shootout vs Nikon D810: 4-stop Underexposure + Push (Flowers)

Includes images up to full resolution and several large crops, RawDigger histograms, Adobe Camera Raw settings along with comments on the processing required. One of the crops shows RGB plus red/green/blue color channels from the ProPhotoRGB color space, showing that one of them is substantially more noisy.

3.6 stop push
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Off Topic: Oroville Dam Damaged, Emergency Spillway Failing

We go more rain than past few weeks than I can remember in 20, perhaps 30 years . I was complaining about my favorite fishing spots not melting out until July...!

But I’m sure glad I don’t live near Oroville Dam (north of Sacramento), because while the main dam is not at risk “a this time”, it looks like the never used emergency spillway is digging quite a gully, which could result in uncontrolled release of water if it back-cuts into the hillside and thence allows untold billions of gallons of water to rush downstream. The emergency spillway was put into use after the main spillway had a massive gap open up about 1/2 down from the top.

Pictures of spillway and such

People downstream are under a mandatory evacuation order as of 5PM today:

LATimes: Live updates: Evacuations ordered below Oroville Dam

"This is not a Drill. Repeat this is not a drill,” the National Weather Service said Sunday, urging people living below Oroville Dam to evacuate. The evacuation was ordered because of a “hazardous situation” involving the Northern California dam's emergency spillway. The National Weather Service said the auxiliary spillway is expected to fail and could send an “uncontrolled release of flood waters from Lake Oroville.”

Emergency Mass Notification for Butte County Residents (Issued 02/11/2017 at 11:30 a.m.)

DWR Press Release: February 12, 2017 6:20p.m.

EVACUATION FOR LOW-LYING COMMUNITIES
Oroville, CA — Based on information received from the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) and the incident command team managing Lake Oroville, counties and cities near Lake Oroville and the surrounding area issued evacuation orders for residents. The concern is that erosion at the head of the auxiliary spillway threatens to undermine the concrete weir and allow large, uncontrolled releases of water from Lake Oroville. Those potential flows could exceed the capacity of downstream channels.
To avert more erosion at the top of the auxiliary spillway, DWR doubled the flow down its main spillway from 55,000 cubic feet per second (CFS) to 100,000 CFS The next several hours will be crucial in determining whether the concrete structure at the head of the auxiliary spillway remains intact and prevents larger, uncontrolled flows.
Current flows are contained with downstream channels.
Flow over the auxiliary spillway weir began Saturday morning and has slowed considerably. DWR officials expect that flow to stop entirely soon, which will reduce the erosion on the downstream side of the structure.
Oroville Dam itself is sound and is a separate structure from the auxiliary spillway.

As I understand it, there is another major storm due this week.

Even with no more damage, it might not be safe for use as a more than half full reservoir for a long time—and it’s a very important reservoir. Now that’s a “shovel ready” project if I ever saw one. Will it takes years to approve repairs, fight lawsuits against repair, plan for, and then repair it? Hopefully not.

California can sure use the rain, but decades of building no new major dams to store rain and snowmelt means that most of it will run into the sea. Go bullet train to nowhere! Meanwhile, the Santa Barbara area remains in severe drought as a peculiar dry spot, though that might change this week.

At least in my area, the ground is super saturated. One modest temblor could cause major damage from mudslides and similar.

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Hasselblad X1D + XCD 45/3.2 SHOOTOUT vs Nikon D810 + Zeiss 35/1.4: Flowers

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list and Nikon wish list.

In my review of the Hasselblad X1D system I seek to answer a seemingly simple question, which is actually quite complicated: is the imaging pipeline of the Hasselblad X1D at its base ISO of 100 superior to the Nikon D810 at its base ISO of 64?

Hasselblad X1D

In my review of the Hasselblad X1D system in my Medium Format section:

Hasselblad X1D Shootout vs Nikon D810 (Flowers)

Includes includes images up to full resolution and several large crops, RawDigger histograms for the full scale and for dark tones, and Adobe Camera Raw settings along with comments on the processing required.

This is an in-depth discussion with some findings that I’m sure any Nikon D810 and/or Hasseblad X1D shooter will find thought provoking. Perhaps more thought provoking: what if Nikon can deliver a near-50-megapixel D820 with per-pixel quality matching or exceeding the Nikon D810? Could be an exciting year.

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Hasselblad X1D with XCD 90/3.2 Aperture Series: White Anthurium

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list and Fujifilm GFX wish list.

The ability of the Hasselblad X1D sensor to record a wide dynamic range with rich color and contrast under mixed lighting of widely varying color temperature is quite impressive, as seen in the Flowers at Russian Ridge example.

Hasselblad X1D

Here I liked the rich contrast of the delicate high-key whites set against the rich dark greens and blacks. I wanted to see just how well highlight detail would hold up.

In my review of the Hasselblad X1D system:

Hasselblad X1D: Aperture Series: White Anthurium Closeup

Includes includes images up to 36 megapixels and two large crops, all from f/3.2 - f/16. Also, notes on exposure and white balance and focus shift demonstrated once again.

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Big Discounts on iMac 5K, the Best Display Out there for Viewing Pleasure

If the iMac 5K display were offered as a display only, say at $1629, it would be worth it. So why not get one, and with a free iMac computer included?

I consider the late 2015 iMac 5K the best display on the market today at any price for viewing images. In this sense, consider it a fantastic display that includes a free computer.

See also the diglloyd DealFinder for iMac 5K as well as all 2015 iMac 5K. Or search for more used Macs.

Note that these Macs are factory sealed Apple refurbished with 1 year warranty.

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Hasselblad X1D: Dynamic Range

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list and Fujifilm GFX wish list.

I shot this series to evaluate dynamic range of the Hasselblad X1D, but it is also worth presenting to show the XCD 45mm f/3.5.

Hasselblad X1D

My main interest here is seeing just how well the very dark tones in the oak tree bark hold up with a maximum +100 shadow boost. What counts to me with a camera in difficult field conditions is how well an image holds up when worked hard during raw conversion (or in “post”). Because many real world images have very demanding dynamic range.

In my review of the Hasselblad X1D system:

Hasselblad X1D Aperture Series and Dynamic Range: Oak Tree Greenery

Includes ACR settings, RawDigger histogram for a maxed-out ETTR exposure, a reference frame without the maximum shadow boost, all from f/3.5 through f/12.

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WPPI Deals at B&H Photo

See also my wishlists at B&H Photo.

View all WPPI deals at B&H Photo. Selected deals (most expire Feb 12).

Certain specials require promo code BHWPPI17.

Hand-selected items that caught my eye, below.

WPPI Deals at B&H Photo thru 12 Feb — Zeiss
WPPI Deals at B&H Photo thru 12 Feb — Sony

 

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Reader Comment: ETTR (Expose to the Right)

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list and Fujifilm GFX wish list.

James A writes:

I was just reading the ETTR section. There is a lot of good information in there that I can hopefully put to use. My question: the article is about 5 years old, sensor technology has evolved somewhat during that time (I assume). Has this evolution changed your opinion on ETTR in 2017?

DIGLLOYD: the ETTR section in DAP is just as applicable today as when I wrote it.

In some ways it is even trickier, because some cameras (Nikon D810, Hasselblad X1D and others) make it very hard to be sure just how much headroom remains. These cameras and many others leave a stop or even two stops of headroom unused with their default metering as well as showing blowout when more than a stop of headroom remains (the Nikon D810 at ISO 64 is notoriously odd this way).

There is an incompetence in play with every camera vendor today: rather than a true raw histogram which would let the photographer see just what the sensor is capturing in each channel, every color camera manufacturer today shows an RGB histogram that bakes in all the JPEG camera settings along with a truncated color gamut of AdobeRGB or sRGB. This is just plain moronic. Alas. The net result is that a stop or even two stops of headroom go unused.

Below, the histogram from the Flowers at Russian Ridge example is nearly perfect, just 1/3 stop or so shy of maximal (maybe 1/2 stop if one can let just a few tiny areas blow out). RawDigger is an excellent tool for assessing whether the exposure is optimal.

RawDigger histogram showing a near perfect exposure within 1/3 stop of blowout

Cameron writes:

First, keep up the great work! I really enjoy reading your articles and wish I had it in the budget to subscribe. Because I’m not a paying subscriber, I thought I’d pass a little info along to you regarding the 3FR/FFF files.

I’ve been shooting with the Hasselblad CF39 for years and learned pretty quickly that the shadows went to mud quickly if any attempts of pulling them brighter were needed. I always shot this back at ISO 50. One day I needed the extra speed so I shot at ISO 400. It was a fashion shoot and halfway through the sequence I must have changed the aperture or lighting because everything was completely blown out. Distressed, I loaded the files to the laptop and was easily able to bring the file back to a usable state using the exposure slider, adjusting the gamma, etc, and both shadow and highlights were fine. I was astonished and happily saved what was almost a ruined lingerie shoot. Later at the studio, I ran this over-exposure experiment at ISO 50 and no amount of over exposure was usable (highlights were simply lost). The same experiment at ISO 100 showed ample room for over-exposure by two stops and yielded beautiful shadow detail—even when pulled up. I’m sure I tested ISO 200 and 400 but the results must have been bad and I’ve never looked back.

Lately I’ve been freelancing at Christie’s in NYC and have been shooting the H5D40 and 60 in their studio. Turns out that the same thing happens with these digital sensors. The native is ISO 100, so shooting at ISO 200 and overexposing by two steps gives the best results—particularly with shadows.

This phenomenon seems to be baked into the Hasselblad DNA—as fas the CCD chips are concerned. I’m wondering if the X1D with its CMOS has the same DNA? If so, it might be something worth looking in to.

DIGLLOYD: unless there is something in Hasselblad that is unlike any other camera I’ve used in ten years, I would say that all of this is basically understanding exposure incorrectly, or rather—getting tricked by misleading metering and particularly misleading histograms. The solution is to use RawDigger to see what is really happening. The end result can in fact be the same as Cameron writes, because at higher ISO the camera “gains up” in a smart way. But for a true base ISO (not a “Lo” setting), there can be no advantage to this higher-ISO-overexpose theory, not that I’m aware of at least. This is why I consider it idiotic that no camera vendor offers a true raw histogram so the user can just see what is actually being captured, in a data/histogram sense.

P.S.: anyone who has the 'budget' to spend months or years instead of a day learning key exposure tricks is penny wise dollar foolish. I take pride in demystifying and showing what is actually going on—teaching effectively things that can baffle photographers for years.

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Hasselblad X1D Example with Rich Color, Dark Tones, Mixed Lighting: Flowers at Russian Ridge

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list and Fujifilm GFX wish list.

The ability of the Hasselblad X1D sensor to record a wide dynamic range with rich color and contrast under mixed lighting of widely varying color temperature is quite impressive.

What particularly impresses me is the highlight discrimination, the subtle tones in the whites and near-whites in the flowers. I’ve noticed that quality to the X1D images in other shots as well.

In my review of the Hasselblad X1D system:

Hasselblad X1D: Example with Rich Color, Dark Tones, Mixed Lighting: Flowers at Russian Ridge

Includes a full-resolution image (slightly cropped).

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Hasselblad X1D REVIEWED: Operational Usability, EVF, Flash Support, etc

See my Hasselblad X1D wish list and Fujifilm GFX wish list.

Gah! Pouring rain for nearly two weeks. I hardly remember what sun and blue sky look like. The Sierra snowpack should be at 200% of normal by now. My favorite fishing holes are not going to melt out until July—dang.

So I revamped and added to my overall look at the operational and usability aspects of the Hasselblad X1D:

  • Overview of Hasselblad X1D
  • Magnified Live View Operation
  • X1D Startup Time, Startup Issues
  • X1D Exposure Behavior and Flash Support
  • X1D Buttons and Controls
  • X1D Operational Issues

I urge any prospective Hasselblad X1 buyer to read all these pages. There is a lot there that matters to me, and some or it will definitely matter to others—even if what matters differs from me to another person to yet another. And with the Fujifilm GFX coming in a few weeks (my #1 top drop-everything priority), I’ll have a lot to say on it as well.

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